IMC 2021: Late Call for Papers

How to Submit

Please use the this form to submit your proposal for consideration. Please only use the email link below to contact us if you have any queries prior to submission of your proposal.

You must clearly indicate in the ‘Abstract’ box¬† the session name (as given below) which your proposal is being submitted.

Submit a Late Paper Proposal

If you are unable to view the list of session proposals below, please click here.

Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.

If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 1811Climatic Change and English Landscapes
Session 702Dust, Diet, and Isotopes: Scientific Analysis of Material Evidence
Session 318Living in the Carolingian World, II: Peasants and the Limits of Social Organisation
Session 812Medieval Ecocriticisms, II: Conceptual Climates - Humans in their Place
Session 508Noblewomen Network, I: Familial Identity and Networks of Power
Session 1107Political Culture in Medievalism and Historiography in the North
Session 2221Reconsidering the Boundaries of Religious Dissent in the Long 12th Century, I
Session 1621Religion and Belief in Early Medieval North Africa
Session 1507Saga Tropes and Motifs
Session 1706Sessions in Honour of Stephen D. White, III: Medieval Violence
Session 308Women and Wills in Late Medieval England, II

Session details

Session

1811
TitleClimatic Change and English Landscapes
Date/Time
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairChris Lewis, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
 
Paper -a The Changing Marshlands along the River Alt, Lancashire: Evidence of Minor Place-Names, c. 1220-1300
(Language: English)
Jonathan Masters, Department of History, Lancaster University
Paper -b Living with Water on the River Trent
(Language: English)
Susan Kilby, School of History, Politics & International Relations, University of Leicester / Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Scholars have long acknowledged the significant economic development of rural communities generated by the agricultural improvement of wetland landscapes such as the Cambridgeshire Fens and Somerset Levels. Despite its small geographical coverage, the wetlands along the River Alt in south-west Lancashire offer an important case study for similar developments in watery environments during the medieval period. Arguably, a substantial proportion of change in the local landscape can be attributed to the introduction of two Cistercian communities from the start of the 13th century. Our knowledge and interpretation of these developments can be enhanced using place-name evidence recorded in title deeds to better understand the geographical context and what impact agricultural practices had on wet lowland climates.

Paper -b:
Alrewas (Staffordshire) sits at the Trent/Tame confluence. The name reveals that its Anglo-Saxon inhabitants were aware of the propensity for this landscape to flood - nevertheless this did not discourage them from settling there. Later medieval field-names allow us to reconstruct the ways in which locals understood this occasionally unpredictable landscape. During a period in which a deteriorating climate frequently undermined peasants’ attempts at agrarian success, a thorough understanding of this challenging environment was essential for local inhabitants. The field-names emphasise this community’s close observation of their watery surroundings, revealing how they lived successfully with the ever-present threat of flooding.

Paper -c:
TBC

Session

702
TitleDust, Diet, and Isotopes: Scientific Analysis of Material Evidence
Date/Time
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/Chair To Be Announced
 
Paper -a Hike to Holy Heights: Movement of the Non-Local Saint-Jean de Todon Elite
(Language: English)
Jane Holmstrom, Department of Anthropology, University of Central Florida
Paper -b Elemental and Isotopic Analysis of Dust for Authentication of Historic Manuscripts
(Language: English)
Johanna Irrgeher, Lehrstuhl für Allgemeine und Analytische Chemie, Montanuniversität Leoben
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Dietary differences as a result of social status became more divergent as the Christian church evolved during the European Medieval period. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of individuals (n=50) buried on the Lacau plateau at the Saint-Jean de Todon cemetery in France (9th to 13th century) has illustrated dietary differences likely linked to hierarchy within this elite group. This is further exemplified through the results of oxygen isotope analysis which indicates that these individuals were also non-locals who moved to the area sometime after childhood.

Paper -b:
Dust is an indicator of the time and place where a certain manuscript was made. A team of University of Continuing Education Krems and Montanuniversität Leoben received the permission to collect dust from early documents from the Monastery of Kremsmünster and Zwettl Monastery. Dust samples were analyzed for their elemental composition as well as strontium isotope ratio signatures as intrinsic indicators to study the authenticity and origin of historical parchment and paper documents. In this paper, we present preliminary results and discuss the potential and limitations of the method.

Session

318
TitleLiving in the Carolingian World, II: Peasants and the Limits of Social Organisation
Date/Time
 
OrganiserNoah Blan, Department of History, Lake Forest College, Illinois
Valerie L. Garver, Department of History, Northern Illinois University
 
Moderator/ChairThomas Kohl, DFG-Kollegforschergruppe 'Migration und Mobilität in Spätantike und Frühmittelalter', Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
 
Paper -a Conserve and Cultivate: Peasants and a Carolingian Moral Ecology
(Language: English)
Noah Blan, Department of History, Lake Forest College, Illinois
Paper -b Life in a Royal Landscape: Evidence from 9th-Century Carolingian Royal Charters
(Language: English)
Elina Screen, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
 
AbstractThe Carolingian World reflected the reach and ambitions of its rulers and thinkers who imagined their unique place in history and the world. The extent to which the majority of people living under Carolingian rule and influence felt the effects of elite efforts to exert power is less clear. Ideal visions of rural social organisation and the place of the least powerful in society did not always match up to traces of lived experience. These papers will explore how the non-elite experienced the Carolingian world as agrarian subjects, economic drivers, and dependents on estates.

Session

812
TitleMedieval Ecocriticisms, II: Conceptual Climates - Humans in their Place
Date/Time
 
SponsorMedieval Ecocriticisms, ARC Humanities Press
 
OrganiserMichael J. Warren, Independent Scholar, Cranbrook
 
Moderator/ChairMichael Bintley, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
 
Paper -a Le Roman de Silence: Species, Gender, Skin
(Language: English)
Aylin Malcolm, Department of English, University of Pennsylvania
Paper -b 'To the Cuckoo's Leah': Birds and Place in Old English Place-Names and Charters
(Language: English)
Michael J. Warren, Independent Scholar, Cranbrook
 
AbstractThese papers address climate broadly as 'locale' characterised by specific conditions, exploring how the natural world features in various conceptualisations of human ‘place’ in the world. Michael Warren examines birds in Old English place-names as indicators of imaginative connections to local environments; Aylin Malcolm addresses the intersecting 'places' of body, identity and environment in Le Roman de Silence; and James Paz explores the vibrant correspondences between maker and matter in Exeter Book Riddles and poems, in which craftspeople and their crafts disrupt established social and cosmic 'climates' and nonhuman things refuse to remain in their rightful places.

Session

508
TitleNoblewomen Network, I: Familial Identity and Networks of Power
Date/Time
 
SponsorNoblewomen Network
 
OrganiserHarriet Kersey, Research Development, Canterbury Christ Church University
Charlotte Pickard, Centre for Continuing & Professional Education, Cardiff University / Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University
 
Moderator/ChairLouise J. Wilkinson, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
 
Paper -a Unequal Marriage and Perceptions of Familial Identity in Capetian France
(Language: English)
Charlotte Pickard, Centre for Continuing & Professional Education, Cardiff University / Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University
Paper -b Of Poison and Golden Ships: Noblewomen and Networks of Power in Norman Italy and the Early Crusader Kingdoms
(Language: English)
Alexandra Locking, Department of History, University of Chicago
 
AbstractWomen frequently had to negotiate the intersection between society's expectations and their lived experience - at times working against the roles traditionally ascribed to them. Noblewomen occupied a unique position in society which, arguably, afforded them greater agency and access to power. And yet, they too had to navigate boundaries, often pushing beyond what was perceived to be the norm. This session will consider the roles that women played in the construction of familial identity and networks of power.

Session

1107
TitlePolitical Culture in Medievalism and Historiography in the North
Date/Time
 
OrganiserRalf Palmgren, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
 
Moderator/ChairRalf Palmgren, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
 
Paper -a The Spartans, the Jomsvikings, and the Eidsvold Constitution: Laconism in the Authorship of Christian Magnus Falsen
(Language: English)
Peter Hatlebakk, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, kultur- og religionsvitskap, Universitetet i Bergen
Paper -b Building Painted Castles in the Air: Medievalism, Internal Colonisation, and White Fragility in Carl Larsson's Art
(Language: English)
Godelinde Gertrude Perk, Faculty of Medieval & Modern Languages, University of Oxford
 
AbstractPaper -a examines some instances of laconism in Scandinavian history-writing about the Middle Ages from the early 19th century, and discusses the broader implications for Christian Magnus Falsen’s Norwegian constitutional project.

Paper -b examines Carl Larsson’s book illustrations and controversial murals; often showing medieval scenes, they visually redraw contemporary medievalisms, but suffused by similar anxieties about indigeneity and identity as criticisms of his work and fin-de-siecle Scandinavian nationalism generally.

Paper -c takes an external approach and examines how German school curriculae would distinguish 'useful' from 'unnecessary' and 'instructive' from 'idle' knowledge of the Nordic Middle Ages.

Session

2221
TitleReconsidering the Boundaries of Religious Dissent in the Long 12th Century, I
Date/Time
 
SponsorDepartment for the Study of Religions, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
 
OrganiserAndra-Nicoleta Alexiu, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Stamatia Noutsou, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
 
Moderator/ChairDelfi I. Nieto-Isabel, Departament d'Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
 
Paper -a Blazing Words in Sulfury Tongues: Heresy as a Symptom of Ecclesiastical Corruption
(Language: English)
Rachel Ernst, Department of History, Georgia State University
Paper -b Reform, Dissent, and the Monasticisation of the World in Geoffrey of Auxerre's Polemical Sermons
(Language: English)
Stamatia Noutsou, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
 
AbstractThe aim of the two sessions is to reconsider heresy with a broader understanding of the concept of religious dissent during the long 12th century. We seek to explore this topic by discussing a selection of the various discourses on religion that emerged during this period. We will demonstrate the growing diversity of religious ideology in Western Europe by discussing how these discourses targeted a variety of audiences and served many different purposes. Thus, the sessions will focus on the tumultuous atmosphere wherein various reforming groups risked their total exclusion from the Church and society by attempting to re-negotiate the boundaries of 'orthodoxy' from within. In addition, given the purpose of their mission and their position within the Church as monks, nuns, or laymen, these authors felt pressured to better flesh out and redefine certain categories from a social or gender-based perspective, while holding on to tradition.

Session

1621
TitleReligion and Belief in Early Medieval North Africa
Date/Time
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAdam Simmons, Department of History, Language & Global Cultures, Nottingham Trent University
 
Paper -a Salvian and the End of Public Paganism in Late Antique Carthage
(Language: English)
Mattias Gassman, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford
Paper -b Clergy and Control in Late Antique Egypt, 5th-8th Centuries
(Language: English)
Joanna Wegner, Instytut Archeologii, Uniwersytet Warszawski
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In the 440s, Salvian of Marseille accused the Christian aristocrats of Carthage of sacrificing to the goddess Caelestis (De gubernatione dei 8.9–17). Often cited as a testimony to the continuation of public, pagan cult until (or after) the end of Rome rule, Salvian's account does not withstand scrutiny. Comparison with the sermons and letters of an African eyewitness (Augustine) shows it to be a rhetorical exaggeration of Christian concessions to traditional custom. It holds little evidentiary value, and narratives of the end of paganism must rely solely on the limited archeological evidence, the legal data, and works of locals such as Augustine and Quodvultdeus.

Paper -b:
In late antique Egypt, the institutional church and its representatives constituted a major social force. Documents preserved on papyri and ostraca, dated to the 6th-8th c., show clerics participating in legal acts or acting as instruments of social control. However, they reveal also circumstances in which the clergy were exposed to lay scrutiny or made reliant on social actors from outside the church. The paper will attempt to trace the complexities of the networks of control and assistance existing between clerical and lay agents, using documents produced by and for the interested parties in the course of everyday activities.

Session

1507
TitleSaga Tropes and Motifs
Date/Time
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairJón Viðar Sigurðsson, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo
 
Paper -a Iron and the Trǫll: The Appearance of the Járnstafr in Old Norse Saga Literature
(Language: English)
Natasha Amber Jo Bradley, Lincoln College, University of Oxford
Paper -b Emotional Climate and Climactic Change: On Some Strategies of Dispute Settlement in the Sagas of Icelanders
(Language: English)
Eugenia Kristina Vorobeva, Jesus College, University of Oxford
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Trolls frequently appear in Old Norse sagas carrying a járnstafr (iron-staff). The process of smelting iron in the medieval period carried with it many taboos, both sexual and social. The járnstafr represents a midpoint in this smelting process; it is no longer the raw iron ore, but it is not yet a sword or a piece of agricultural equipment with a defined purpose in society. This sheds light on the liminal space occupied by the trǫll. This paper will add to the scholarly discourse on Old Norse trolls through analysis of the járnstafr, a hitherto neglected aspect of their nature.

Paper -b:
Analysing a series of instances containing a proverbial motif 'Scorn by throwing gold in one's face' and its near-formulaic lexical framing found in some sagas of Icelanders, this paper addresses the interlinked problems of text-performativity, emotional expressivity, and narrative devices used for the concise yet comprehensive depiction of violence, its repercussions within the saga, as well as for the justification of the choice of a particular dispute-processing strategy. By paying attention to the scene-structure and its connection to the broader literary tradition, social practices, and emotional regimes of the time, a new perspective on the complex relationship between gender, power, and regulations as they were seen by the sagamen and their audiences may be revealed.

Session

1706
TitleSessions in Honour of Stephen D. White, III: Medieval Violence
Date/Time
 
OrganiserRichard E. Barton, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Tracey L. Billado, Department of History, Queens College, City University of New York
 
Moderator/ChairWilliam I. Miller, Law School, University of Michigan
 
Paper -a The Politics of Anger and Violence in Central Medieval France
(Language: English)
Richard E. Barton, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Paper -b 'Oh, My Soul, You Have Wrestled with My Heart': Honour, Shame, and Conflict in Kievan Rus
(Language: English)
Yulia Mikhailova, Department of Communication, Liberal Arts & Social Sciences, New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology
 
AbstractThe third of the sessions in honor of Stephen D. White draws on White’s seminal work on the politics of medieval 'violence'. Barton demonstrates the conceptual linkage between anger and violence as dangerous social ills in several texts from 11th- and 12th-century France but argues that that linkage itself is political and therefore questionable. Naderer discusses the changing boundaries of 'legitimate' and 'illegitimate' violence found in accounts of conflict in 12th- and 13th-century Scandinavia. Mikhailova unpacks the politics of emotional displays that are recorded in accounts of violence and peace-making in medieval Kievan Rus'.

Session

308
TitleWomen and Wills in Late Medieval England, II
Date/Time
 
OrganiserChris Woolgar, Department of History, University of Southampton
 
Moderator/ChairRachel Delman, Department of History, University of York
 
Paper -a 'Periculum mortis': Women's Wills from the York Archbishops’ Registers in the Time of the Black Death
(Language: English)
Marianne Wilson, Department of History, University of York
Paper -b Women, Wills, and Textiles
(Language: English)
Chris Woolgar, Department of History, University of Southampton
 
AbstractThe pious and commemorative bequests of female testators have much to tell us about the events of the life course and the connections of women. These papers look at a group of wills from the period of the Black Death to examine responses to the crisis; the documentation of life course events and ideas about the performance of gender are considered; and the special interest the wills of women have in textiles, from kerchiefs and belts for friends to beds linked to household lineage, is discussed, demonstrating the importance of material culture for medieval mentalities.