Late Call for Papers

How to Submit

If you would like to discuss your paper proposal prior to submission, please contact us by emailing imc@leeds.ac.uk.

You must clearly indicate in the ‘Abstract’ box the session name (as given below) for which your proposal is being submitted. Submissions not linked to one of the session proposals below will be disregarded.

Late paper proposals are considered on a first come, first served basis and will be passed directly to the relevant session organiser for review.

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If you are unable to submit your proposal via the webform, please provide the following details by email to imc@leeds.ac.uk:

  • Session name from the Late Call for which your submission is to be considered
  • Full title of your paper
  • Up to 4 Index Terms for your paper
  • Any equipment or specialist software requirements to deliver your paper
  • Your full name, and the names of any co-authors
  • Your affiliation, including full name of your university and department
  • Contact email address
  • Contact postal address, including postal/zip code

IMC 2021: Late Call for Papers

We are presently looking for individual paper submissions for the below session proposals. Each year, the IMC welcomes papers on all aspects of medieval studies, alongside a special thematic focus. In 2021, this special thematic focus will be 'Climates'. The proposed sessions listed below currently require an additional paper. Please note that inclusion here does not imply that a session has been included in the IMC programme, which is still being reviewed by the Programming Committee.

Climatic Change and English Landscapes

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 1811
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Chris Lewis, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Paper -a The Changing Marshlands along the River Alt, Lancashire: Evidence of Minor Place-Names, c. 1220-1300
(Language: English)
Jonathan Masters, Department of History, Lancaster University
Paper -b Living with Water on the River Trent
(Language: English)
Susan Kilby, School of History, Politics & International Relations, University of Leicester / Institute for Name-Studies (INS), University of Nottingham
Abstract Paper -a:

Scholars have long acknowledged the significant economic development of rural communities generated by the agricultural improvement of wetland landscapes such as the Cambridgeshire Fens and Somerset Levels. Despite its small geographical coverage, the wetlands along the River Alt in south-west Lancashire offer an important case study for similar developments in watery environments during the medieval period. Arguably, a substantial proportion of change in the local landscape can be attributed to the introduction of two Cistercian communities from the start of the 13th century. Our knowledge and interpretation of these developments can be enhanced using place-name evidence recorded in title deeds to better understand the geographical context and what impact agricultural practices had on wet lowland climates.

Paper -b:

Alrewas (Staffordshire) sits at the Trent/Tame confluence. The name reveals that its Anglo-Saxon inhabitants were aware of the propensity for this landscape to flood – nevertheless this did not discourage them from settling there. Later medieval field-names allow us to reconstruct the ways in which locals understood this occasionally unpredictable landscape. During a period in which a deteriorating climate frequently undermined peasants’ attempts at agrarian success, a thorough understanding of this challenging environment was essential for local inhabitants. The field-names emphasise this community’s close observation of their watery surroundings, revealing how they lived successfully with the ever-present threat of flooding.

Crusades and Nature, I

Session 215
Date/Time 05 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Abstract An understanding of Anthropocene – the history of human interactions with natural environment – has never been more pressing than today. The session will explore the intersection of crusader studies and environmental studies. It will address encounters with, responses to, and representations of a broad variety of natural phenomena (broadly defined) having to do with crusades and the Latin States. The topics include portents and marvels; encounters with familiar and unfamiliar fauna, flora, and natural phenomena; and cultivation, consumption, and trade in crops, fruit, spices, etc. The session will serve as a springboard for an edited collection of articles.
Organiser Jessalynn Bird, Department of Humanistic Studies, Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Indiana
Organiser email: jbird@saintmarys.edu [View delegate history]
Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Organiser email: lapina@wisc.edu [View delegate history]
Moderator/Chair Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison [View delegate history]
Paper -a Celestial Phenomena in Fall 1097 / Spring 1098 in the Chronicles of the First Crusade
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison [View delegate history]
Index Terms:  20: Crusades;  37: Historiography – Medieval
Paper -b Growing, Growing, Gone: Reconstructing Agricultural Cultivation Areas in the Kingdom of Jerusalem
(Language: English)
Heather Elizabeth Crowley, Department of Art History, Cabrillo College, California [View delegate history]
Index Terms:  20: Crusades;  25: Economics – Rural

Erasure in Late Antiquity, II: Erasure, Law, and the Late Roman Court

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Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 1619
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Kay Boers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht & Guy Walker, Department of Classics, Trinity College Dublin
Moderator/Chair Hope Williard, University Library, University of Lincoln
Paper -a Claudian and Roma: Fighting Pagan Erasure at a Christian Court
(Language: English)
Ben Kybett, Department of Classics, University of Cambridge
Paper -b ‘As if said law had never even been promulgated’: Justinian’s Legal Erasures
(Language: English)
David Rockwell, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien
Abstract This session will focus on alternative forms of historical, cultural, and even legislative erasure at the very highest political level: the court of the emperors’ itself. The first paper (Kybett) explores the personification of the goddess Roma in the poetry of Claudian as a rebuttal to Prudentius’ Christian portrayal of the goddess and his attempts to erase pagan culture from the political sphere. The second (Rockwell) looks at the retroactive ‘erasure’ of legislation by Justinian and its repercussions on various aspects of sixth-century life.

Female Saints in the Nordic Region

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Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 707
Date/Time 06 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Tiffany White, Department of Scandinavian, University of California, Berkeley
Moderator/Chair To Be Announced
Paper -a The Saints of Heilagra meyja drápa and Their Cult in Medieval Iceland
(Language: English)
Ermenegilda Rachel Müller, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
Paper -b Guðrún Ósvífrsdóttir and the Penitent Women Saints: Overlap, Influence, and Function
(Language: English)
Natalie van Deusen, Department of Modern Languages & Cultural Studies, University of Alberta
Abstract This panel addresses the several understudied female vitae, both in prose and verse, that are extant in the Old Norse-Icelandic corpus. The main focus throughout is the Icelandicization of non-Icelandic saints, both in hagiographic material and so-called secular literature.

Heretical, Mystical, and Poetical Innovations in and around Bohemia

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Session 1619
Date/Time 05 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Abstract Paper -a:
The Granum Sinapis, an early 14th-century, eight-stanza poem in Middle High German is a literary precis of the mystical theology of Meister Eckhart to whom the work has been sometimes been attributed. To assist in contemplating the poem, an anonymous commentator appended two crude diagrams to the manuscript: an empty circle bounded by a solidly drawn circumference; and a set of concentric, permeable circles each labeled with one of the rankings in a pseudo-Dionysian hierarchy. Together the poem and diagrams portray a mystical cosmography, collapsing light and darkness, the universe and nothingness – a space in which god may be found.Paper -b:
Defeated on many battlefields, and at an advanced age, Oswald von Wolkenstein (1376-77/1445) retreated to a safer, but always pugnacious literary war against the Hussites. He had been facing them and their ideals since the Council of Constance and composed against them two poems, Kl. 27 and Kl. 32. Kl. 27 is Oswald’s only certified anti-Hussite song, in which the nobleman calls all his peers to fight against the army of geese in the name of God; Kl. 32 is a strict prediction of eternal punishment for heretics, Jews, heathens, and unbelievers. Realising how ruinous the crusades had proved, Oswald abhorred the incompetence of his allies, and started directly addressing God and the Virgin Mary for immediate intercession: Kl. 109b is a translation of a Marian hymn containing references to doctrines condemned by Hus’s followers; Kl. 134 is the beginning of a longer lost anti-Hussite poem in which the poet puts Christianity in God’s hands. This paper intends to investigate, from a lexical and semantic point of view, the changes in Oswald’s perception of the Hussites in his late works, and the turning of his vivid and aggressive exhortations into silent and almost resigned prayers.
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Arnold Otto, Historisches Institut, Universitaet Paderborn
Paper -a A Mystical Cosmography: The Granum Sinapis – Poem and Pictures
(Language: English)
Philip Liston-Kraft, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Harvard University
Paper -b Oswald Von Wolkenstein and His Literary War against the Hussites: From Sword to Prayer
(Language: English)
Dario Capelli, Dipartimento di Lingue e Letterature, Comunicazione, Formazione e Società, Università degli Studi di Udine

Practical Equestrianisms in the Middle Ages

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Session 1616
Title Practical Equestrianisms in the Middle Ages
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Tilbury
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Moderator/Chair Jürg Gassmann, Independent Scholar, Wexford
Paper -a Running Blind: The Shaffron as a Form of Equine Control in the Tournaments of Maximilian I
(Language: English)
Emma Herbert-Davies, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper -b The ‘Ideal’ Horse: Characteristics throughout Pre-Modern Sources
(Language: English)
Hylke Hettema, Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), Universiteit Leiden
Jennifer Jobst, Independent Scholar, Texas
Abstract The pre-industrial world was characterized by a closer contact with non-human animals, including equines, than a 21st century researcher can imagine. Most medieval people would have at least some idea about the basics of taking care of an equine or how to judge a horse – and a horseman – by appearance. The papers in this session explore different aspects in medieval equestrian practice, from the characteristics of various equines, both horses and mules, to the peculiarities of using specific tack, such as blind shaffrons. The authors come from a variety of disciplinary fields, including archaeology and Arabic studies.

Reconsidering the Boundaries of Religious Dissent in the Long 12th Century, I

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Session 1221
Date/Time 07 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Sponsor Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Organiser Andra-Nicoleta Alexiu, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Stamatia Noutsou, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair Delfi I. Nieto-Isabel, Departament d’Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
Paper -a Blazing Words in Sulfury Tongues: Heresy as a Symptom of Ecclesiastical Corruption
(Language: English)
Rachel Ernst, Department of History, Georgia State University
Paper -b Reform, Dissent, and the Monasticisation of the World in Geoffrey of Auxerre’s Polemical Sermons
(Language: English)
Stamatia Noutsou, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Abstract The aim of the two sessions is to reconsider heresy with a broader understanding of the concept of religious dissent during the long 12th century. We seek to explore this topic by discussing a selection of the various discourses on religion that emerged during this period. We will demonstrate the growing diversity of religious ideology in Western Europe by discussing how these discourses targeted a variety of audiences and served many different purposes. Thus, the sessions will focus on the tumultuous atmosphere wherein various reforming groups risked their total exclusion from the Church and society by attempting to re-negotiate the boundaries of ‘orthodoxy’ from within. In addition, given the purpose of their mission and their position within the Church as monks, nuns, or laymen, these authors felt pressured to better flesh out and redefine certain categories from a social or gender-based perspective, while holding on to tradition.

The Social Dynamics of Religious Dissent, IV: The Social Impact of Inquisitions and Anti-Inquisitorial Resistance in Italy

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Session 2319
Date/Time 09 Jul 2021, 16.30-18.00
Abstract The records of inquisitions provide us with an invaluable source for the social history of the regions in which they took place. It cannot be forgotten, however, that the inquisitors who recorded these details also had a major effect on both dissident communities and wider society through their operations. While there has been much discussion of the way inquisitors ‘constructed’ heresy, or represented an increasingly persecuting society, our sessions seek to follow the pioneering lead of James Given in exploring the social stresses and strains created by inquisitions, social strategies for coping with investigation, and resistance to authority. In particular, the potential for regional variation in inquisition impact and dissident reaction deserves greater attention: this session will focus on Italy, the previous having focussed on Languedoc.
Sponsor Centre for the Digital Research of Religion & Dissident Networks Project (DISSINET), Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Organiser Robert Shaw, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
David Zbíral, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair Delfi I. Nieto-Isabel, Departament d’Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
Paper -a How Confiscation for Heresy Helped Redistribute Land Ownership in North-Central Italy, 13th-14th Centuries: Was Its Impact Deliberate or Random?
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Independent Scholar, London
Paper -b Repression, Resistance, and Politics in the Inquisitorial Trials in Piedmont, 1387-1388
(Language: English)
František Novotný, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno