Late Call for Papers

How to Submit

If you would like to discuss your paper proposal prior to submission, please contact us by emailing imc@leeds.ac.uk.

You must clearly indicate in the ‘Abstract’ box the session name (as given below) for which your proposal is being submitted. Submissions not linked to one of the session proposals below will be disregarded.

Late paper proposals are considered on a first come, first served basis and will be passed directly to the relevant session organiser for review.

Please click here to submit your proposal.

If you are unable to submit your proposal via the webform, please provide the following details by email to imc@leeds.ac.uk:

  • Session name from the Late Call for which your submission is to be considered
  • Full title of your paper
  • Up to 4 Index Terms for your paper
  • Any equipment or specialist software requirements to deliver your paper
  • Your full name, and the names of any co-authors
  • Your affiliation, including full name of your university and department
  • Contact email address
  • Contact postal address, including postal/zip code

IMC 2021: Late Call for Papers

We are presently looking for individual paper submissions for the below session proposals. Each year, the IMC welcomes papers on all aspects of medieval studies, alongside a special thematic focus. In 2021, this special thematic focus will be 'Climates'. The proposed sessions listed below currently require an additional paper.

Borders that Bind, I: Power and Peripheries in the Later Medieval Holy Roman Empire

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 519
Date/Time 06 July 2021, 09.00-10.30
Organiser Duncan Hardy, Department of History, University of Central Florida

Benjamin J. Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester

Lisa Rolston, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch

Moderator/Chair Benjamin J. Pope, John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester
Paper -a Nothing but Letters?: Effects and Effectiveness of Increased Written Communication in the Reign of Emperor Frederick III, 1440-1493
(Language: English)
Steffen Krieb, Regesta Imperii, Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur, Mainz
Paper -b Breaching Borders: Late Medieval Responses Regarding Threats to Territorial Sovereignty
(Language: English)
Brian-Timmy Erbe, Historisches Institut, Universität des Saarlandes
Abstract The Holy Roman Empire of the later Middle Ages witnessed a proliferation of borders and boundaries, as delimited and sometimes enclosed communities and institutions combined and coexisted with highly decentralized and fragmented political authority. But many of these boundaries went hand-in-hand with intensified ‘cross-border’ connections. This session will explore connections between the imperial centre and its periphery, and between cities and towns in peripheral regions of the Empire. It focuses on how power was both exercised and understood as a result of these cross-border connections.

Carolingian Poetic Borders, II

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 2308
Date/Time 09 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Matthew Bryan Gillis, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Moderator/Chair Matthew Bryan Gillis, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Paper -a The ‘Cruel Death’ of Children in Carolingian Poetry
(Language: English)
Valerie L. Garver, Department of History, Northern Illinois University
Paper -b Walahfrid Strabo’s Models for Crossing the Border between This Life and the Beyond
(Language: English)
Kathrin Henschel, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Abstract Writing Latin verse was the literary form par excellence in the Carolingian world (c. 750-c. 1000), which produced the largest body of Latin poetry since antiquity. Nevertheless, Carolingian Latin poetry remains a largely under-studied topic. This session presents papers that consider how Carolingian poets explored crossing both poetic and cosmic boundaries in their works. The speakers will consider not only how poets haunted their poems with the dead and with ghostly echoes of other poets’ words, but also how such texts presented readers with models for their own border crossing between life and death.

Changing Forests: Forest Management in Long Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, III

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 2217
Date/Time 09 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Organiser David Wallace-Hare, Department of Classics & Humanities, San Diego State University
Moderator/Chair Bernhard Muigg, Institut für Forstwissenschaften, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Paper -a The Gold of the Pine Forests: Resin Production and Uses in the Early and Middle Byzantine Empire
(Language: English)
Sophia Germanidou, McCord Centre for Landscape Archaeology, Newcastle University
Paper -b Predefining the Early Medieval Forest: Roman Management of Forest Resources
(Language: English)
Andrew Fox, Department of Classics & Archaeology, University of Nottingham
Abstract Forests often represented border areas between cultivated land and wilderness and typically contained key resources the ownership of which was hotly contested and controlled. As hubs of changing and contested resources, forests expanded, contracted, and disappeared for a variety of reasons in the premodern age. The Changing Forests session series provides a cross-disciplinary approach examining forest use in a less studied but crucially important period for understanding forest dynamics, Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (3rd-10th century CE). Session III examines forest product exploitation strategies in the early Middle Ages.

Changing Forests: Forest Management in Long Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, IV

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 2317
Date/Time 09 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Organiser David Wallace-Hare, Department of Classics & Humanities, San Diego State University
Moderator/Chair Chelsea Shields-Más, Department of History & Philosophy, State University of New York, Old Westbury
Paper -a The Early Irish Law Tract Fidbretha: ‘Tree-Judgments’
(Language: English)
Charlene Eska, Department of English, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University
Paper -b Forest and Tree Use and Misuse in the Visigothic Code
(Language: English)
David Wallace-Hare, Department of Classics & Humanities, San Diego State University
Abstract Forests often represented border areas between cultivated land and wilderness and typically contained key resources the ownership of which was contested and controlled. As hubs of changing and contested resources, forests expanded, contracted, and disappeared for a variety of reasons in the premodern age. The Changing Forests session series provides a cross-disciplinary approach examining forest use in a less studied but crucially important period for understanding forest dynamics, Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (3rd-10th century CE). Session IV approaches the theme of changing forests from the perspective of legal issues surrounding the forest in Roman, Visigothic, and Old Irish law..

Crusades and Nature, I

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 215
Date/Time 05 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Abstract An understanding of Anthropocene – the history of human interactions with natural environment – has never been more pressing than today. The session will explore the intersection of crusader studies and environmental studies. It will address encounters with, responses to, and representations of a broad variety of natural phenomena (broadly defined) having to do with crusades and the Latin States. The topics include portents and marvels; encounters with familiar and unfamiliar fauna, flora, and natural phenomena; and cultivation, consumption, and trade in crops, fruit, spices, etc. The session will serve as a springboard for an edited collection of articles.
Organiser Jessalynn Bird, Department of Humanistic Studies, Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Indiana
Organiser email: jbird@saintmarys.edu
Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Organiser email: lapina@wisc.edu
Moderator/Chair Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Paper -a Celestial Phenomena in Fall 1097 / Spring 1098 in the Chronicles of the First Crusade
(Language: English)
Elizabeth Lapina, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Paper -b Growing, Growing, Gone: Reconstructing Agricultural Cultivation Areas in the Kingdom of Jerusalem
(Language: English)
Heather Elizabeth Crowley, Department of Art History, Cabrillo College, California

Heretical, Mystical, and Poetical Innovations in and around Bohemia

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 1619
Date/Time 05 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Abstract Paper -a:
The Granum Sinapis, an early 14th-century, eight-stanza poem in Middle High German is a literary precis of the mystical theology of Meister Eckhart to whom the work has been sometimes been attributed. To assist in contemplating the poem, an anonymous commentator appended two crude diagrams to the manuscript: an empty circle bounded by a solidly drawn circumference; and a set of concentric, permeable circles each labeled with one of the rankings in a pseudo-Dionysian hierarchy. Together the poem and diagrams portray a mystical cosmography, collapsing light and darkness, the universe and nothingness – a space in which god may be found.Paper -b:
Defeated on many battlefields, and at an advanced age, Oswald von Wolkenstein (1376-77/1445) retreated to a safer, but always pugnacious literary war against the Hussites. He had been facing them and their ideals since the Council of Constance and composed against them two poems, Kl. 27 and Kl. 32. Kl. 27 is Oswald’s only certified anti-Hussite song, in which the nobleman calls all his peers to fight against the army of geese in the name of God; Kl. 32 is a strict prediction of eternal punishment for heretics, Jews, heathens, and unbelievers. Realising how ruinous the crusades had proved, Oswald abhorred the incompetence of his allies, and started directly addressing God and the Virgin Mary for immediate intercession: Kl. 109b is a translation of a Marian hymn containing references to doctrines condemned by Hus’s followers; Kl. 134 is the beginning of a longer lost anti-Hussite poem in which the poet puts Christianity in God’s hands. This paper intends to investigate, from a lexical and semantic point of view, the changes in Oswald’s perception of the Hussites in his late works, and the turning of his vivid and aggressive exhortations into silent and almost resigned prayers.
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Arnold Otto, Historisches Institut, Universitaet Paderborn
Paper -a A Mystical Cosmography: The Granum Sinapis – Poem and Pictures
(Language: English)
Philip Liston-Kraft, Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Harvard University
Paper -b Oswald Von Wolkenstein and His Literary War against the Hussites: From Sword to Prayer
(Language: English)
Dario Capelli, Dipartimento di Lingue e Letterature, Comunicazione, Formazione e Società, Università degli Studi di Udine

Noblewomen Network, III: Female Agency and Legal Identities

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.<
Session 708
Date/Time 06 July 2021, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Harriet Kersey, Research Development, Canterbury Christ Church University
Charlotte Pickard, Centre for Continuing & Professional Education, Cardiff University / Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Open University
Moderator/Chair Emma Cavell, Department of History, Swansea University
Paper -a In Her Own Words: Margaret Paston’s Agency in 15th-Century Norfolk
(Language: English)
Mikee Delony, Department of Language & Literature, Abilene Christian University, Texas
Paper -b The Heiress and Her Agency
(Language: English)
Alheydis Plassmann, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaft, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Abstract Women frequently had to negotiate the intersection between society’s expectations and their lived experience – at times working against the roles traditionally ascribed to them. Noblewomen occupied a unique position in society which, arguably, afforded them greater agency and access to power. And yet, they too had to navigate boundaries, often pushing beyond what was perceived to be the norm. Considering the themes of legal identities, agency and rebel women, this session draws on material from northern Europe.

Practical Equestrianisms in the Middle Ages

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.<
Session 1616
Title Practical Equestrianisms in the Middle Ages
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Tilbury
Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga
Moderator/Chair Jürg Gassmann, Independent Scholar, Wexford
Paper -a Running Blind: The Shaffron as a Form of Equine Control in the Tournaments of Maximilian I
(Language: English)
Emma Herbert-Davies, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper -b The ‘Ideal’ Horse: Characteristics throughout Pre-Modern Sources
(Language: English)
Hylke Hettema, Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), Universiteit Leiden
Jennifer Jobst, Independent Scholar, Texas
Abstract The pre-industrial world was characterized by a closer contact with non-human animals, including equines, than a 21st century researcher can imagine. Most medieval people would have at least some idea about the basics of taking care of an equine or how to judge a horse – and a horseman – by appearance. The papers in this session explore different aspects in medieval equestrian practice, from the characteristics of various equines, both horses and mules, to the peculiarities of using specific tack, such as blind shaffrons. The authors come from a variety of disciplinary fields, including archaeology and Arabic studies.

Religion and Belief in Early Medieval North Africa

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.<
Session 1621
Title Religion and Belief in Early Medieval North Africa
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Adam Simmons, Department of History, Language & Global Cultures, Nottingham Trent University
Paper -a Salvian and the End of Public Paganism in Late Antique Carthage
(Language: English)
Mattias Gassman, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford
Paper -b Clergy and Control in Late Antique Egypt, 5th-8th Centuries
(Language: English)
Joanna Wegner, Instytut Archeologii, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Abstract Paper -a:
In the 440s, Salvian of Marseille accused the Christian aristocrats of Carthage of sacrificing to the goddess Caelestis (_De gubernatione dei_ 8.9–17). Often cited as a testimony to the continuation of public, pagan cult until (or after) the end of Rome rule, Salvian’s account does not withstand scrutiny. Comparison with the sermons and letters of an African eyewitness (Augustine) shows it to be a rhetorical exaggeration of Christian concessions to traditional custom. It holds little evidentiary value, and narratives of the end of paganism must rely solely on the limited archeological evidence, the legal data, and works of locals such as Augustine and Quodvultdeus.Paper -b:
In late antique Egypt, the institutional church and its representatives constituted a major social force. Documents preserved on papyri and ostraca, dated to the 6th-8th c., show clerics participating in legal acts or acting as instruments of social control. However, they reveal also circumstances in which the clergy were exposed to lay scrutiny or made reliant on social actors from outside the church. The paper will attempt to trace the complexities of the networks of control and assistance existing between clerical and lay agents, using documents produced by and for the interested parties in the course of everyday activities.

Representations of Temperate / Intemperate Emotions in Visual Art and Literature, IV: Mystical and Clerical Writing

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.<
Session 1813
Date/Time 08 July 2021, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Dafna Nissim, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Moderator/Chair Sara Offenberg, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Paper -a Overcoming Fears, Controlling Demons: Magic and Royal Behaviour
(Language: English)
Gal Sofer, Department of Jewish Thought / Joyce & Irving Goldman Medical School, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Paper -b Gender, Genre, and Divine Love in the Writings of Mechthild of Magdeburg and Henry Suso
(Language: English)
Alice Spiers, St Anne’s College, University of Oxford
Abstract In medieval philosophy, excessive joy, fear, or anger were signs of an imbalance in the human organism that had implications on one’s moral behavior, decision-making, and, ultimately, salvation. Medieval theological treatises, mirror for princes genre texts, fictional literature, and chivalric manuals wrote of temperance as a virtue that has to be practiced and achieved, a quality that demonstrated the balanced path between the extremes of excess and deficiency. Medieval texts and visual culture reflect many allusions to the importance of temperate emotions in realizing the virtue of moderation. This session addresses mystical and clerical texts. The papers reveal how the context of authorship and production, as well as genre conventions, influence expression of emotions in texts and the way the writers communicate them with their audiences.

The Social Dynamics of Religious Dissent, IV: The Social Impact of Inquisitions and Anti-Inquisitorial Resistance in Italy

Please click here to submit your proposal.
Please ensure you include the session title (above) in the abstract box of your submission.
Session 2319
Date/Time 09 Jul 2021, 16.30-18.00
Abstract The records of inquisitions provide us with an invaluable source for the social history of the regions in which they took place. It cannot be forgotten, however, that the inquisitors who recorded these details also had a major effect on both dissident communities and wider society through their operations. While there has been much discussion of the way inquisitors ‘constructed’ heresy, or represented an increasingly persecuting society, our sessions seek to follow the pioneering lead of James Given in exploring the social stresses and strains created by inquisitions, social strategies for coping with investigation, and resistance to authority. In particular, the potential for regional variation in inquisition impact and dissident reaction deserves greater attention: this session will focus on Italy, the previous having focussed on Languedoc.
Sponsor Centre for the Digital Research of Religion & Dissident Networks Project (DISSINET), Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Organiser Robert Shaw, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
David Zbíral, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair Delfi I. Nieto-Isabel, Departament d’Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
Paper -a How Confiscation for Heresy Helped Redistribute Land Ownership in North-Central Italy, 13th-14th Centuries: Was Its Impact Deliberate or Random?
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Independent Scholar, London
Paper -b Repression, Resistance, and Politics in the Inquisitorial Trials in Piedmont, 1387-1388
(Language: English)
František Novotný, Centre for the Digital Research of Religion, Masarykova Univerzita, Brno