IMC 2022: Late Call for Papers

How to Submit

Please submit the following information by email to imc@leeds.ac.uk:

  • Session name from the Late Call for which your submission is to be considered
  • Full title of your paper
  • Abstract for your paper (up to 200 words)
  • Whether you wish to present in person or virtually
  • Up to 4 Index Terms for your paper
  • Any equipment or specialist software requirements to deliver your paper
  • Your full name, and the names of any co-authors
  • Your affiliation, including full name of your university and department
  • Contact email address
  • Contact postal address, including postal/zip code

Submissions not linked to one of the session proposals below will be disregarded. Late paper proposals are considered on a first come, first served basis and will be passed directly to the relevant session organiser for review.

The late call for papers will close on Friday 17 June 2022, 17:00 BST.

Papers & Sessions With Vacancies

We are presently looking for individual paper submissions for the below session proposals, as well as session proposals to fill a small number of gaps in the programme. Each year, the IMC welcomes papers on all aspects of medieval studies, alongside a special thematic focus. In 2022, this special thematic focus will be 'Borders'. The proposed sessions listed below currently require an additional paper.

Africa and the Atlantic: Contact, Exploration, Self-Perception

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 103
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Víctor Muñoz-Gómez, Departamento de Geografía e Historia, Facultad de Humanidades / Instituto de Estudios Medievales & Renacentistas, Universidad de La Laguna
Paper -a The Atlantic Ocean and the Medieval Islamic World: From Boundary of Expansion to Zone of Contact and Exploration, Andreas Obenaus, Forschungsschwerpunkt Globalgeschichte, Institut für Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte, Universität Wien
Paper -b Christ’s New Frontier: Portugal and the Evangelisation of the Atlantic Coast of Africa in the 15th-16th Centuries, Centro de Investigação Transdisciplinar ‘Cultura, Espaço e Memória’ (CITCEM), Universidade do Porto
Abstract Paper -a:
During the Early and High Middle Ages the _dār al-Islām_ had a suitable access to the Atlantic Ocean, stretching roughly from modern central Portugal to the far south of Morocco. In many medieval Arabic sources this ocean was seen as a boundary of Muslim expansion in the west as well as the end of the (known) world. But in contrast, some Arabic and even Latin documents allude to Atlantic activities of Muslim seamen, ranging from offshore fishing to maritime trade and naval warfare, which made this ocean into a zone of contact at least between northwest Africa and the Iberian Peninsula. Furthermore, a few Arabic sources dating from the 9th to the 14th centuries shed some light on the concepts, awareness, and knowledge concerning the Atlantic Ocean and even indicate a growing interest in its exploration. So the aim of this paper is to reveal these Islamic roots of early Atlantic contacts and exploration.Paper -b:
The arrival of the Portuguese south of the Sahara is usually referred as an essential step in the European age of maritime expansion. After an initial phase of conflict, commerce would be the preferred tool to forge long-standing diplomatic, economic, and social relations. Simultaneously, crown-sponsored agents tried to convert the locals, particularly rulers and elites. Why? What was Portugal’s role in setting new frontiers for European Christianity? And why did some Africans easily accept this alien religion? This presentation focuses on the initial evangelisation of the Atlantic coast of Africa and its importance in redefining Europe’s political and mental borders.

After the Icelandic Commonwealth, IV: Making Connections, Narrating Identity

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 838
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Thomas Morcom, Abteilung für Skandinavistik, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Moderator/Chair Ann Sheffield, Department of Chemistry, Allegheny College, Pennsylvania
Paper -a From Israel to Iceland: The Hebrew Bible and the Typological Structure of _Sturlunga Saga_, Daniel Martin White, Department of Icelandic & Old Norse Studies, Ronin Institute, New Jersey
Paper -b ‘Þorsteinn hét maðr’: A Socio-Onomastic Analysis, Solveig Bollig, Institutionen för språkstudier, Umeå universitet
Abstract This is the final panel of a series on ‘Iceland in the Medieval World’, focusing on discursive navigations of the social, cultural, and political position of Iceland, after the island became part of the kingdom of Norway in 1262-1264. This panel seeks to unravel how later medieval Old-Norse Icelandic cultural products invoke and transform legal, religious, or narrative material in order to think about textual adaptation as a political practice. This comparative approach offers a reconsideration of how medieval Icelanders asserted their position within medieval textual networks, an impulse that may have been particularly significant in the fraught cultural context of later medieval Iceland.

Between the Earthly and the Ideal

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 714
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Alexandru Simon, Centrul de Studii Transilvane, Academia Romane, Cluj-Napoca
Paper -a Beast Fables from the East: Narrative Similarities across Continental Boundaries, Ved Prabha Sharma, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Paper -b Connecting with the Sacred: Pictorial Devices and Liturgical Paraphernalia in the Wall Paintings of the Sanctuary of St Nicholas’ Church in Dorohoi, Oana Iacubovschi, Institute for South-East European Studies, Bucharest
Abstract Paper -a:
The ‘literalness’ that exuded from beast fables often give an impression of simplicity, which takes away the serious hermeneutic attention that beast fables deserve. Though the targeted audience of these stories were often ‘simple’ (vulgus) people, the narrative aim was itself challenging. The _Hitopadesha_ and _Panchtantra Katha_, as well as, the beast fables used in medieval grammar schools (compiled later in _Disticha Catonis_) were, in fact, serving the fundamental purposes of _utilitas_ and _moralitas_. They employed the use of ancient liberal arts, primarily, _ars rhetorica_, as aquifers that facilitated the proper percolation of their non-vulgus dogmas. The paper aims to analyse the adaptation of a non-vulgus dogma to a vulgus audience, and in the process, discuss the birth of the beast literature as a ‘vernacular’ genre coming out of this adaptation.Paper -b:
This paper aims to highlight a peculiarity of the recently restored murals from the late 15th-century Church of St Nicholas in Dorohoi, namely the animation of the iconographic program of the sanctuary through a pictorial apparatus designed to abolish the boundaries between the ideal liturgy officiated by the holy hierarchs and the performance of the local clergy. Permeability of the borders is achieved by expanding the sacred space through illusionistic architectural devices, through the penetrating gazes of the holy hierarchs directed at the spectators – a pictorial means in which painters show great skill and consistency, applying it even to the protagonists of the evangelical history – and through a series of details evoking tactility and everyday life that particularise the scene of the Communion with the bread and wine and the Last Supper.

Borders as Areas of Control

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1527
Date/Time 07 July 2022, 09.00-10.30
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Lucas Villegas-Aristizábal, Bader International Study Centre, Queen’s University, Ontario
Paper -a Border inside Borders: Forms and Functions of Boundaries Related to Medieval Castles in the Rural Landscape, Martina Bernardi, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università degli Studi Roma Tre
Paper -b Settlements and Frontiers around São Mamede’s Hill in the Middle Ages, Ana Cristina Santos Leitão, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa
Abstract Paper -a:
Castles are fortified structures that have shown different forms and functions over the centuries, closely related to the historical and territorial context in which the structures were built. However, these realities in the rural landscape have two characteristics connected with boundaries and landscape: to border and to be borded. Castles often (but not always during the Middle Ages) have the function of enclosing the population within the walls, but at the same time these are structures located within other borders. This paper aims to illustrate all the borders evidence related to medieval castles in the Italian context.                               Paper -b:
The main research question of this PhD dissertation is the formation of the urban network composed by 8 villages, located around the Serra de São Mamede. The spatio-temporal delimitation of the research field, is in Alto Alentejo region in the kingdom of Portugal and the chronological scope defined is from the 13th to 15th centuries.
The network originated in the process of Christian reconquest, of Iberia Península, and was created from the need to populate an almost desert area that needed to be occupied in order to create a land border with the kingdom of Castile in an offensive/defensive logic for that territory, which represented a strategic physical barrier.

Borders in and of Medieval Towns

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 519
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 09.00-10.30
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Milan Pajic, Institut de recherche Religions, spiritualités, cultures, sociétés, Université catholique de Louvain
Paper -a Visible, Marked, and Invisible Borders of the Medieval and Early Modern Town: The Vienna Example, Ferdinand Opll, Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Paper -b Re-Evaluating Medieval Trieste: Cultural Exchanges in the Borderlands, Katalin Prajda, Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Abstract Paper -a:
The oldest example for Urban Borders in Vienna is the construction of the City Walls before the late 1230s as one of the main characteristic features of any Medieval Town. Used for defensive purposes and control, they were demolished after 1857. Another visible Border was the defense line for the suburbs (15th century). Made of stone only partly, it was rather feeble and destroyed during the First Ottoman Siege of 1529. Only after 1700, in a period of new attacks from Hungarian-Transylvanian forces another fortified defense-line was constructed around the suburbs. It had, however, its real importance as a Border for levying taxes.For marked and invisible Borders there is no comparable place in memory. Among these types the district, where the Town’s Judge could exert his competencies, in German: ‘Burgfried’, was the first to be documented for Vienna (1244). A profound initiative of marking out this Border with cornerstones started only lately, in 1698. Similarly – and in this case: totally – forgotten are the Borders of the Quarters within Vienna. Documented in the early 14th century, this ‘pure’ administrative Border acquired quite a big number of diverse functions. Its existence ended with the Urban Expansion of 1850.
Paper -b:
The present paper proposes to re-evaluate the written documentation and the historiography of medieval Trieste in order to shed a new light on its role played in cultural exchanges between various political entities, such as the Republic of Venice, the Patriarchate of Aquileia, the Duchy of Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary. It does so by studying primarily the evolution of merchant networks as agents of cultural mediation and how cultural differences and political belonging were represented by both the primary source material and consequently by the specialist literature and national historiographies published in various languages.

The Boundaries of Monastic Institutions, II

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 228
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 14:15-15.45
Organiser Simone Wagner, Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Moderator/Chair Simone Wagner, Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Paper -a Blurred Boundaries: Co-Spatiality between Cities and Collegiate Churches in the Later Middle Ages, Simone Wagner, Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien, Universität Erfurt
Abstract Monasteries usually secluded themselves from the world by building walls around their institutions. These walls did not only have a religious meaning but also a legal and administrative one. The physical aspect was tied to imagined boundaries being created between the religious and the secular. Imagined and physical boundaries interacted. Nevertheless, it varied how much religious communities sought to isolate themselves. The relationship between the religious and the secular sphere was highly contested throughout the Middle Ages. Especially in the case of less regulated communities, the boundaries were permeable and space was used both by religious as well as secular actors. Since enclosure was seen as especially important for female monasteries, monastic boundaries and their permeability seem to have been gendered. However, apart from spiritual matters monasteries were also concerned about the boundaries of their possessions. Charters and cartularies include detailed descriptions of the boundaries of specific possessions. Chronicles and vitae show how nuns and monks hoped to protect their possessions through performative acts such as processions with relics.

Boundary Work from East to West

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1230
Date/Time 06 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Alaric Hall, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of English, University of Leeds
Paper -a Crossing Borders to Predict the Future: Divination by Geomancy from East to West, Arianna Dalla Costa, Warburg Institute, University of London
Paper -b Negotiating Moral Boundaries: Attitudes to Wealth in Medieval Qur’anic Exegesis, Alena Kulinich, Department of Asian Languages & Civilizations, Seoul National University / Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford
Abstract Paper -a:
My paper focuses on the form of astrology known as _geomantia_. In particular, I aim to address the liminality of this practice. Geomancy crosses a geographical, linguistic, and cultural border: it originates in the Islamic world and enters the West in the 12th century through translations from Arabic into Latin. Secondly, it challenges the cosmological borders between the heavens and the sublunary world: it is a form of astrology, yet, instead of observing the heavens, the geomancer reads their signs in the sand. Finally, geomancy crosses the boundary between astrological prediction and psychological analysis, as it wants to investigate the depths of the human soul.
Paper -b:
This paper deals with references to wealth in the text of the Qur’an, and their interpretations in medieval Islamic exegesis. While some Qur’anic verses regard material wealth as divine favour, others emphasise its transient and worldly nature, diverting people away from God, and disapprove of accumulation of wealth and the greed and arrogance of the wealthy. This paper focuses on the ways in which medieval Muslim commentators interpreted these references, identifying the shifts in attitude towards material wealth and examining the strategies that the commentators employed to negotiate the boundaries between the sanctioned and disapproved categories of wealth.

Bridging Borders, III: Layers in Written Artefacts

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1711
Date/Time 07 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Hanna Wimmer, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC) / Kunstgeschichtliches Seminar, Universität Hamburg
Moderator/Chair Claudia Colini, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster ‘Understanding Written Artefacts’, Universität Hamburg
Paper -a One Music Scribe, Multiple Writing Initiatives: Differentiating Layers of Writing in Late Medieval Music Manuscripts, Andreas Janke, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster ‘Understanding Written Artefacts’, Universität Hamburg
Paper -b Marginalising Core Texts: ‘Moving’ Borders between Textual Layers in Byzantine Lexicographic Manuscripts, Stefano Valente, Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures (CSMC), Exzellenzcluster ‘Understanding Written Artefacts’ / Institut für Griechische und Lateinische Philologie, Universität Hamburg
Abstract The Cluster of Excellence ‘Understanding Written Artefacts’ follows a comparative approach to studying how the production of written artefacts has shaped human societies and cultures, and how these in turn have adapted written artefacts to their needs. This session focuses on layers as physical or intellectual ‘borders’ in manuscripts, in particular on production and transmission processes in written artefacts from the Middle Ages. Close investigation of multiple material and textual layers produced by scribes and users over a certain span of time will help to better reconstruct cultural and educational processes.

British Archaeological Association, IV: Artefacts and Special Finds

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 611
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Paper -a ‘Leaping into the unknown’: Special Deposits and Their Significance in the Later Medieval Elite Residence, Erik Matthews, Hornby Castle Project, Northallerton
Paper -b Weaving Monumental Borders,  Millie Horton-Insch, Department of History of Art, University College London
Abstract This final session looks at artefacts and particular finds and objects to explore the lives of people in the past and the borders they perhaps perceived in their lives.

Building and Breaking Cultural Barriers on Medieval Mount Athos

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 840
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Zachary Chitwood, Historisches Seminar, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Moderator/Chair Zachary Chitwood, Historisches Seminar, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Paper -a From the Caucasus to Mount Athos: Language Barriers in Iviron Monastery, Tinatin Chronz, Historisches Seminar, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Paper -b OpenAtlas: Open Software for Overcoming Borders Between Disciplines, Alexander Watzinger, Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities & Cultural Heritage (ACDH-CH), Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Abstract As a microcosm of the Christian Orthodox world, medieval Mount Athos attracted monks, patrons, and pilgrims from throughout Southeastern and Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, and the Caucasus. The monasteries of the Holy Mountain, which formed what was in essence a monastic confederation, over the course of the medieval period saw different approaches to negotiating cultural differences: from the creation of so-called ‘ethnic monasteries’ to complex internal regulations which determined the space and scope for each culture of Orthodoxy. The papers in this session will explore how these cultural boundaries were formulated, maintained, and sometimes even broken in this unique environment.

Conflict and Integration: Crossing Medieval Borders, II - Multillingual and Multicultural Borders

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 615
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Karen Pinto, Department of Religious Studies, University of Colorado Boulder, and Elisa Ramazzina, Faculty of English, University of Oxford / School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Moderator/Chair To be announced
Paper -a From Germanic Languages to Italian: Borrowing without Borders, Elda Morlicchio, Dipartimento di Studi Letterari, Linguistici e Comparati, Università degli Studi di Napoli L’Orientale
Paper -b Borders and Crossroads: Poetry as a Means of Cultural and Linguistic Exchange in Medieval Anatolia, Ester Cristaldi,  Dipartimento di Lingue, Letterature e Culture Moderne, Università di Bologna
Abstract This second panel explores how medieval borders fostered multilingual and multicultural processes, thus demonstrating how frontiers not only separate, but also promote integration. Through the study of onomastic systems and loanwords, Paper -a demonstrates how modern Italian shows evident traces of the contact between Germanic tribes (Goths, Lombards, Franks) and the local Latin-speaking communities, thus demonstrating the fluidity of linguistic borders in early medieval Italy. Paper -b shows how medieval Anatolia was a multilingual and multicultural environment where different cultures coexisted beyond borders despite their differences, sharing languages and mechanisms for the oral transmission of culture and poetry.

Crossing Medieval Borders: Multicultural and Contested Spaces, II - Navigating the Multiculturalism of Borders

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1115
Date/Time 06 July 2022, 11:15-12.45
Organiser Karen Pinto, Department of Religious Studies, University of Colorado Boulder
Moderator/Chair Elisa Ramazzina, Faculty of English, University of Oxford / School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Paper -a  ‘Versus partes Transalpinenses’: The Transylvanian Saxon Towns and Transcarpathian Political Communication, c. 1467-1526, Matthew Coulter, St John’s College, University of Cambridge
Paper -b Ginseng for the Qa’an: Human and Material Mobilities in Competing Conceptualizations of the Yuan-Koryo Border, Aaron Molnar, Department of History, University of British Columbia
Abstract This panel explores the multiculturalism of borders in the medieval world, and the way that territory was organized, divided or contested across time and space. Paper -a investigates the writings of medieval Islamicate geographers and travelers and their conceptions of territories and borders, in particular the crossing of borders or passage from one place to another. Paper -b explores the role of Saxon towns and their diverse inhabitants in diplomatic relations along permeable frontier boundary zones with the use of documentary sources. Paper -c reexamines the portrayal of Mughals as outsiders and invaders in light of the multiculturalism that marked the vibrant Mughal court. Together, the contributions to this panel work to contrast medieval conceptualizations of borders with their treatment in our modern day world, illuminating the role that borders have played in shaping conflicts and in the development of states.

Empires without Borders: Collaboration and Rivalry between the Roman and Sasanian Empires, II - Exploring Political-Cultural Interaction through Identity and Exchange

Format of Session In-Person
Session No. 625
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Domiziana Rossi, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University, and Sean Strong, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair Eve MacDOnald, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Paper -a Crown and Uṙ: The Wedding Ceremony in 5th-Century Armenia (Language: English)
Daniel Alford, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford
Paper -b Dayeaks: Fostering in Early Medieval Armenia, 5th-7th Centuries (Language: English)
Lewis Read, Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Abstract Besides warfare, great empires, such as the Roman and the Sasanian, are characterised by the political symbology given to cultural features. Those different and peculiar features belong to specific cultural identities. The consequent sense of belonging is powerful and faceted. This is especially true in border regions, influenced by both empires. The dressing fashion, weddings, and fostering families can be read under such a different perspective. This panel examines this engaging perspective and tackles the geographical region of Armenia, as well as the shared lower border region surrounding Egypt and lower Syria.

In the Middle of What?: Period Boundaries in Medieval Studies, I

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 214
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Gwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet
Moderator/Chair Matthew Firth, College of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide
Paper -a The Conundrum of Medieval History
(Language: English)
Shivan Sharma, Janki Devi Memorial College, University of Delhi
Paper -b A Heap of Sand through the Hourglass: Historical Periodisation and the Sorites Paradox
(Language: English)
Samuel Cardwell, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto
Abstract This session challenges the boundaries of periodisation applied both to and within the field of ‘Medieval Studies’. The first paper probes the complex relationship between the concepts of the ‘medieval and the ‘modern’, and while the second paper examines and problematises the internal boundary between Old and Middle English, its implications also probe this relationship. The final paper applies the Sorites paradox to the problem of periodisation, and explores the potential of vagueness as a solution.

Internal Borders in the Late Antique, Early Medieval, and Byzantine World, I: Imperial Power and Politics in Late Antiquity

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 1513
Date/Time 07 July 2022, 09.00-10.30
Organiser Alice van den Bosch, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Exeter
Moderator/Chair Richard Flower, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Exeter
Paper -a The Borders of Official Religion: Conformity and Officeholding in Theodosian Legislation
(Language: English)
Robin Whelan, Department of History, University of Liverpool
Paper -b Between Imperial Centre and the Local Populace: The Provincial Aristocrat of Kekaumenos
(Language: English)
Arie Neuhauser, St Cross College, University of Oxford
Abstract This panel will explore aspects of Imperial power and politics in Late Antiquity that interacted with and transcended with complex theological, administrative, and conceptual borders. The first paper will explore the ‘border’ established by the Theodosian dynasty which excluded non-Orthodox Christians from holding administrative positions, and the reasoning behind their moves to limit positions of state power to Orthodox Christians. Our second paper will discuss the role of provincial aristocrats in mediating relationships between local communities and Constantinople in the 11th century, exploring internal borders between centre and province. Finally, the panel’s third paper will address the late Roman ritual of adoratio, and the changing presentation of the status of the Emperor, which negotiated, constructed and presented the boundaries of imperial power and person.

Making Meaning through Religious Painting and Ecclesiastical Interiors

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 112
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Livia Lupi, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
Paper -a ‘The Times They Are a-Changing’: An Examination of Giotto’s Crucifix and Masaccio’s Trinity in the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Linda Steele, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa
Paper -b _Cristo Vivo_: Mimicking Christ’s Living Body in Early Renaissance Sculpture, Mads Vedel Heilskov, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London
Abstract Paper -a:
Alfred Acres defines mundane/worldly time as the temporal passage of years or moments that are depicted on one plane of existence. It is a concrete narrative that occurs in a singular dimension. However, the discourse of Christian time is not as easily discerned and occurs on a multi-layered plane. By utilising the frameworks provided by St Augustine and others, I will examine Giotto’s Crucifix and Masaccio’s Trinity at the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella. I will investigate the uses of naturalism by artists that illustrate the concept of collapsing time within an image. Augustine’s premise is that time, within Christian theology, exists on one plane, not on three. As with the Holy Trinity, time collapses into a singular being, with past, present, and future, for the purposes of Christian interpretation and theology, collapse into one existence.Paper -b:
In early renaissance Italy, the phenomenon of the manmade Christ in image or sculpture acquiring life was referred to as ‘Cristo Vivo’. This phenomenon will be interrogated by analysing in depth the techniques applied by renaissance sculptors in order to replicate the human frame and so mimic the living body in form as well as function. It will first analyse the replication of interior and exterior anatomy, then move on to analyse the ways in which bodily functions were replicated. In that way, the coming to life of sculptures of the crucified Christ will be seen as a process of becoming via the application of a series of artistic and artisanal techniques.

Mapping Cultural Geographies between Past and Present: Burials in Early Irish Literature

Format of Session Virtual
Session No. 719
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Sarah Künzler, School of Humanities (Celtic & Gaelic), University of Glasgow
Moderator/Chair Christina Cleary, School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
Paper -a ‘Quis est qui sepultus hic’?: Burials, the Past, and the Present in Medieval Irish Texts, Helen Imhoff, Independent Scholar, Hannoversch Münden
Paper -b Mapping the Future?: Burials in the Lives of Saints from the Book of Lismore, Sarah Künzler, School of Humanities (Celtic & Gaelic), University of Glasgow
Abstract References to burials in medieval Irish literature are related to various borderlines: they can be linked to tribal borders, are emblematic of the border between life and death, and they can blur the distinction between the pagan past and the Christian present or future. The papers in this session explore reflective engagements with burials in early Irish texts (and other North Atlantic literatures). This shows that in these literatures, borders can reveal profound human concerns about the spatial organisation of knowledge and social or religious order.

Medieval Animals in Conflict and Aggression, I

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1217
Date/Time 06 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser Alice Choyke, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien
Moderator/Chair Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien
Paper -a When Beasts Turn Bad: Animals and Aggression in Iceland, Bernadette McCooey, Independent Scholar, Birmingham
Paper -b Animals Used by the Mongols during Their Invasion of Hungary, 1241-1242, Balázs Nagy, Department of Medieval History, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest
Abstract Animals appear in scenarios of conflict and aggression in many guises. They can be used by humans to demonstrate aggression and power in times of conflict. On the other hand, humans continually aggress on animals in hunting or even their slaughter for meat. Animal on animal aggression and conflict was also treated metaphorically or adapted for human use as in falconry. Finally, some came into conflict with people and showed them aggression in their own right.

Medieval Text Networks and Digital Analysis, II: Digitally Describing and Analysing Related Texts

Format of Session In-Person
Session No. 305
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Sita Steckel, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Moderator/Chair Jeffrey C. Witt, Department of Philosophy, Loyola University Maryland
Paper -a Canon Law in the Digital Age: Identifying Quotations, Transmission, and Intertextual Relations                                                  (Language: English)                                                                                                 Christof Rolker, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaften und Europäische Ethnologie, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Paper -b Digitising Controversy: Building a Data Model for Networks of Polemical Texts   (Language: English)                                                               Sita Steckel, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Abstract The sessions aim to connect scholars interested in the digital analysis of medieval text networks and intertextuality. They will focus on digital tools and approaches which can model or analyze those relationships between texts or parts of texts that typically characterize medieval legal, theological or polemical texts. The sessions are intended as a forum to discuss current approaches and tools. This second half of a double session will focus of use cases, discussing different sets of digitized texts or digital databases allowing us to study texts linked via material transmission or intertextual content.

Mendicant Thought

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1039
Date/Time 06 July 2022, 09.00-10.30
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Melanie Brunner, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper -a Nature and Grace among the Franciscans: Summa Halensis, Bonaventure, and John Peckham, Christopher Cullen, Department of Philosophy, Fordham University
Abstract Paper -a:
Debates over nature and grace loom large in the Middle Ages as today. One of the major fault lines has been the understanding of the relationship between nature and grace. More attention is due the medieval Franciscans on these issues. This paper examines the theories of the state of nature in the prelapsarian condition among three Franciscan thinkers: William of Middleton (likely author of the section of the Summa Halensis), Bonaventure, and John Peckham. What is of particular interest is that these thinkers posit a state of ‘pure’ nature, not as a mere theoretical construct, but as an actual historical moment, prior to the gift of sanctifying grace and the Fall.

Metaimages, II: Beyond the Frame of the Enshrined Icon

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 312
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 16:30-18.00
Organiser Giulia Puma, Département d’Histoire, Université Côte d’Azur / Département de l’Enseignement Supérieur, Collège Sévigné, and Maria Alessia Rossi, Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University
Moderator/Chair Livia Lupi, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
Paper -a Meta-Paintings in Italy and Byzantium Compared, Hans Bloemsma, Department of Art History / University College Roosevelt, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper -b: Meta-Paintings and Their Viewers: Performing Devotion through Time and Space, Giulia Puma, Département d’Histoire, Université Côte d’Azur / Département de l’Enseignement Supérieur, Collège Sévigné, and Maria Alessia Rossi, Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University
Abstract This second session, dedicated to meta-images and their borders, focuses on the continuous production of images-within-images in Byzantine and Italian paintings through the medieval period. Speakers will reflect on the timeless message these images convey and their ability to move beyond perceptible realities and to connect the viewer to a supernatural realm. Topics will include the _imago clipeata_ from the 6th century onwards as a tool of abstraction from the surrounding space in monumental decorations, metaimages as copies or ‘visual quotations’ between Byzantium and Italy, and 14th-century metapaintings as reflections of contemporary devotion, and the active role of the late medieval viewer.

Patristics and Cognitive Sciences: Moving the Borders of Research

Format of Session Virtual Session
Session No. 1616
Date/Time 07 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Vladimir Ivanovici, Institut für Kirchengeschichte, Christliche Archäologie und Kirchliche Kunst, Universität Wien / Istituto di storia e teoria dell’arte e dell’architettura, Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio, Universita’ della Svizzera italiana
Moderator/Chair Uta Heil, Institut für Kirchengeschichte, Christliche Archäologie und Kirchliche Kunst, Universität Wien
Paper -a Christian Incubation and Cognitive Science of Religion: Possibilities and Problems, Mark Beumer, Faculty of Medicine, Univerzita Karlova, Praha
Paper -b Patristics and the (Interdisciplinary) Study of Emotion, Vladimir Ivanovici, Institut für Kirchengeschichte, Christliche Archäologie und Kirchliche Kunst, Universität Wien / Istituto di storia e teoria dell’arte e dell’architettura, Accademia di Architettura di Mendrisio, Universita’ della Svizzera italiana
Abstract While scholars focusing on early Christianity have adapted concepts and methodologies developed across the Cognitive Sciences, Patristic scholars have been more reluctant to follow this path, despite the Church Fathers’ lasting views on how body, mind, and affect function, and their shaping of the way Christians interact with the divine through the setting up of rituals that stimulated all aspects of embodied existence. The papers in this section use instruments developed in the Cognitive Sciences to review how late antique Church Fathers understood and sought to control various aspects of embodied existence (i.e., thoughts, dreaming, emotion). The session seeks to explore the possibilities and limits of this approach, thus redrawing the margins of research in Patristics.

Regarding Henries?: Representating Kingship in Medieval and Modern Sources

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 208
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 14.15-15.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair David Green, Centre for British Studies, Harlaxton College, University of Evansville
Paper -a John of Salisbury: The Mirrored Tyrannies of King and Archbishop, Grace Nicoll, Department of History, Classics & Religion, University of Alberta
Paper -b A (Mostly) Unknown Text Arguing for the Sanctity of Henry the Young King, Moreed Arbabzadah, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge, and Hugh M. Thomas, Department of History, University of Miami
Abstract Paper -a:
John of Salisbury analyses the powers of church and state and the differences between godly and wicked rulers in his political treatise the _Policraticus_. Thomas Becket and King Henry II, who respectively meet John’s criteria of church and state tyranny, are used as case studies. This paper discusses his categorisation of secular and ecclesiastical princes, focusing on his analogy of the state and Church as body and soul. John’s views on the justification of tyrannicide will be examined along with an analysis of the contradictory nature of his non-hierocratic views.Paper -b:
In 1875, in his Rolls Series edition of Ralph of Coggeshall’s _Chronicon Anglicanum_, Joseph Stevenson published an additional text, ‘Thomas Agnellus De Morte et Sepultura Henrici Regis Angliae Junioris’. Unfortunately, Stevenson gave no hint that he was including only about 30 percent of the text, covering Henry’s death and some subsequent miracles but excluding most of Thomas’s remarkable arguments about why the young king should be considered a saint despite committing adultery, rebelling against his father, and seizing treasure from churches to do so. The presenters will discuss the unpublished sections of this work, of which they are preparing the first full edition.

Social Lives of Humans and Animals in the Early Medieval Period, II: Human-Bird Relations

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 1605
Date/Time 07 July 2022, 11.15-12.45
Organiser Harriet Jean Evans Tang, Department of Archaeology, Durham University, and Karen Milek, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Moderator/Chair Harriet Jean Evans Tang, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Paper -a Chickens and Vikings?: The Domestic Fowl and Its Significance in Early Medieval Scandinavia and Iceland, Eric (Kathryn) Ania Haley-Halinski, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
Paper -b Norrænaðr: ‘Norwegianing’ Falconry Motifs in Strengleikar’s Jonet
Paper -c
Abstract The practical, social, and cognitive impacts of living, interacting, and communicating with animals on a daily basis are central aspects of life in multi-species communities. The second of these interdisciplinary sessions will focus on bird-human relations in Viking-age and medieval Scandinavia, from daily farming life, to elite hunting and translation of these relations into literary texts.

Violating Sacred Space in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, II: How to Get Away with Murder in the Church?

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 604
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 11:15-12.45
Organiser Kay Boers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht & Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair Kay Boers, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper -a Was It Possible to Get Away with Murder in an Early Medieval Church?, Warren Brown, Division of the Humanities & Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology
Paper -b They Did Not Get Away with Murder in the Church: The ‘Erembalds’ and the Assassination of Charles the Good of Flanders, 1127, Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Abstract In these sessions we investigate conflicts revolving around, or making use of the concept of sacred space, and in particular debates surrounding the violent intrusion of ecclesiastical space. In the Late Antique and Early Medieval worlds, churches were generally regarded as sacred and were meant to be kept free from any kind of pollution, and in particular, worldly violence. The shedding of blood within its enclosed confines was not only regarded as a serious violation of the sacredness of the church building, but it was also a transgression of the legal provisions of asylum. These norms, however, did not stop people from using violence in churches and sometimes killings took place even inside the church’s most sacred areas. This peculiar type of violence not only created great scandal, it also produced highly charged debates extolling the victims and exonerating the perpetrators.

Visual Language, Knowledge, and Power

Format of Session Virtual
Session No. 101
Date/Time 04 July 2022, 11:15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Claire Renkin, Yarra Theological Union, University of Divinity, Box Hill, Victoria
Paper -a The Wolf: A Warrior Symbol from Eastern to Western Europe,  Alexandra Costache-Babcinschi, Departamentul de Limbi Moderne și Comunicare în Afaceri, Facultatea de Relații Economice Internaționale, Academia de Studii Economice din București
Paper -b Fantastic Lionesque Symbols in East Asian Traditions, Fumihiko Kobayashi, Independent Scholar, New Jersey
Abstract Paper -a:
Animal symbolism is both rich and intricate in European mythology, folklore, iconography, and vernacular texts. The wolf is one of the most common images appearing from East to West. Its representations are neither simple nor homogeneous though; their variety and complexity demand thorough research and subtle understanding. The wolf-warrior is only one of the multiple portraits of the wolf as recorded through late Antiquity and to the Fall of Constantinople. Our paper will focus on such illustrations as can be traced in the several geographical areas from the borders of medieval Christianity. The British Isles, France, Wallachia, Moldavia, and Transylvania are some of the regions that will make our centre of attention.Paper -b:
This paper focuses on lionesque symbols that have widely prevailed across East Asian cultures since medieval times to this day. Zoologically, lions’ habitats do not exist in East Asia, but those symbolized lion images have birthed various folklore and striking iconographies representing supernatural power that folks there believed could ward off evil spirits from the whole communities. This symbolism of the unknown lion perfectly narrates and iconizes how seriously and skillfully our ancestors wove the desires and fears that they experienced in everyday life into the fabric of their folklore and vernacular iconographies. In conclusion, this paper indicates that our ancestors fashioned such symbols from unknown creatures, relying on them to alleviate their everyday anxieties.

Women and Gender in the Post-Roman Kingdoms, III: Italy

Format of Session Hybrid
Session No. 817
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 16.30-18.00
Organiser Eric Fournier, Department of History, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Moderator/Chair Samuel Cohen, Department of History, Sonoma State University, California
Paper -a Women According to the Lombard Laws
(Language: English)
Laury Sarti, Historisches Seminar, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg / Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Paper -b The Significance of Women and Children in Jordanes’ Getica
(Language: English)
Brian Swain, Department of History & Philosophy, Kennesaw State University, Georgia
Abstract It is to address an important gap in current scholarship on women and gender in the post-Roman Western kingdoms that we present a series of panels on the theme of ‘women and gender in the post-Roman kingdoms’. We are especially interested in a bottom-up perspective, to analyze the place, role, and experiences of women in the daily life of the period, and to think about how such an approach might alter our view of the social, cultural, and religious history of these kingdoms. Limited by our sources, however, we will also investigate the absence of women and gender concerns in our texts, and look for alternative fonts of knowledge, such as material culture, archaeology, epigraphy, and visual arts.

Working in Translation

Format of Session In Person
Session No. 520
Date/Time 05 July 2022, 09.00-10.30
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair To be announced
Paper -a Between Canon and Apocrypha: John Trevisa’s Translation of the _Gospel of Nicodemus_, Philip John Wallinder, Department of English, University of Exeter
Paper -b From Wildness to Domestication: An Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Horse-Training as a Transition from Feral Beast to Ideal Destrier in the French Translations of Jordanus Rufus’ _De medicina equorum_, 13th-15th Centuries, Camille Mai Lan Vo Van Qui, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Exeter
Abstract Paper -a:
Discussion of John Trevisa as a translator has tended to characterise the _Gospel of Nicodemus_ as both an early work and an outlier within his corpus. This paper, by the editor of a new edition of Trevisa’s translation, argues that it is neither. On the contrary, close reading of the text suggests it post-dates the _Polychronicon_, whilst the apocryphal, but nonetheless authoritative, nature of the Latin _Evangelium Nicodemi_ makes a translation into English an undertaking akin to the Wycliffite Bible. Such a project was wholly in keeping with Trevisa’s pattern of translating key Latin authorities into English.                                                                                 Paper -b:
A defining characteristic of medieval horse-training, as described in the French translations of Jordanus Rufus’ _De medicina equorum_ (c. 1250), is that it is applied on a colt raised in feral conditions for the first two to three years of his life. Unlike antique methods that focussed on foals domesticated since birth, this approach is fraught with difficulties linked to handling an adult-sized wild animal. An overview of contemporary literature shows that wildness and even monstrosity were components of the ideal warhorse, one example being the anthropophagous Bucephalus. Destriers had to be entirely faithful to one master but inapproachable by other men. Rufus’s training method appears to attempt to realise this literary ideal. An interdisciplinary study of his method, comparing the French manuscripts with a practical experimentation, on real feral horses, of the advice given, will help to understand the reasons behind this approach and to determine its effects.