IMC 2022: Late Call for Papers

How to Submit

Please use the the form linked below to submit your proposal for consideration. If you have any queries prior to submitting your proposal, please email imc@leeds.ac.uk.

Please only use the email link below to contact us if you have any queries prior to submission of your proposal.

You must clearly indicate in the ‘Abstract’ box¬† the session name (as given below) which your proposal is being submitted.

Click here to begin your submission.

The late call for papers will close on Friday 17 June, 17:00 BST.

Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.

If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 341Aspects of Late Medieval Power
Session 1035Comparative Studies of Medieval England and Iceland, I: Histories
Session 1135Comparative Studies of Medieval England and Iceland, II: Literature
Session 216Defining Community and Agency in the Medieval Built Environment
Session 1132Defining the Boundaries of Female Rulership, II: Diplomatic Networks
Session 1024Hebrew Manuscripts and Their Margins, I: The Margins of Science
Session 239Indecent Theologies, II: Phalluses, Virgins, Saints, and Other Average Indecencies
Session 339Indecent Theologies, III: No Gods, No Masters
Session 112Making Meaning through Religious Painting and Ecclesiastical Interiors
Session 1539Nicholas of Cusa, I: Cusa's De visione Dei in Perspective
Session 315Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, II: Making (Up) the Frontier
Session 1625Transforming Borders in Late Antiquity: A Panoramic View, IV - North Africa & Conclusion
Session 1730Trust across Borders, II
Session 101Visual Language, Knowledge, and Power

Session details

Session

341
TitleAspects of Late Medieval Power
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairGerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest/Wien
 
Paper -a Family, War, and Power: The Plumpton Correspondence and the Late 15th Century
(Language: English)
Beatriz Breviglieri Oliveira, Departamento de Filosofia, Universidade de Lisboa / Departamento de História, Universidade de São Paulo
Paper -b Manifestations of Power: A German Noble Family in 14th-Century Sweden and Their Networks, Positions, and Spatiality
(Language: English)
Thomas Neijman, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet
 
AbstractPaper -a:
The letters exchanged between members of families such as the Celys, the Pastons, and the Stonors have often helped historians understand and illustrate English history during the 15th century. However, it's not often that the families themselves are studied on their own, and how they contributed and were affected by the world around them. This paper aims to give a glimpse at how a particular family, the Plumptons, fitted in that scenario, one of instability, power play, and war, how their own family dynamics operated amidst it all, and how it affects our comprehension of English local history and memory.

Paper -b:
During the 14th century there were an influx of German noblemen to Sweden. This paper addresses how one of these families - the Vitzen's - manifested themselves, their positions, and networks. By combining different representations, social networks, and spatiality - positions, groups, and fields are created - which could be used to compare between competing social networks. With the inclusion of changes over time the migrated nobility is studied in the context of a changing situation, and thereby the power dynamics within the wider nobility in Sweden.

Session

1035
TitleComparative Studies of Medieval England and Iceland, I: Histories
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 09.00-10.30
 
OrganiserKatharine Marlow, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
 
Moderator/ChairRebecca Drake, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
 
RespondentLuthien Cangemi, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
 
Paper -a Acts of Collective Self-Representation: Studying Ethnicity in Anglo-Saxon England and Medieval Iceland
(Language: English)
Katharine Marlow, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
Paper -b Marital Customs in Medieval Scandinavia and Medieval England
(Language: English)
Maria Tranter, Departement Geschichte, Universität Basel
 
AbstractContinued interest in comparative approaches to studying medieval England and Iceland since our sessions of the same name in 2020 drives this session to once more consider the purpose of comparative studies of history across borders from the early to late Middle Ages. Our primary question is: what can we learn about medieval English and Icelandic history through comparison? Within this, this session focuses on social and cultural history, questioning the role of the individual in medieval English and Icelandic communities.

As our respondent for this session, Luthien Cangemi brings a well-grounded knowledge of Anglo-Scandinavian social and political history, which will further broaden the session's discourse of English and Icelandic medieval social and cultural history. Moreover, Luthien's response will actively draw together the findings of the session's two papers, finding their similarities and differences and drawing these out for the benefit of the session attendees. We believe that this response is integral to our comparative methodology across both of our sessions; not only do we seek to encourage comparative approaches to the various disciplines of study of medieval England and Iceland, but we also seek to encourage a comparative and connective understanding of the ideas presented in this session.

Session

1135
TitleComparative Studies of Medieval England and Iceland, II: Literature
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserRebecca Drake, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
 
Moderator/ChairKatharine Marlow, School of European Languages, Culture & Society, University College London
 
RespondentBasil Arnould Price, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
 
Paper -a Permeable Boundaries: The Coastal Zone in Medieval English and Old Norse-Icelandic Romance
(Language: English)
Rebecca Drake, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Paper -b Imagining the British Isles in Old Norse-Icelandic Fantastical Literature
(Language: English)
Maj-Britt Frenze, Independent Scholar, Florida
 
AbstractContinued interest in comparative approaches to studying medieval England and Iceland since our sessions of the same name in 2020 drives this session to once more consider the purpose of comparative studies of literature across borders from the early to late Middle Ages. Our primary question is: what can we learn about medieval English and Icelandic literature through comparison? We seek to understand how literary traditions crossed the Atlantic, and the cultural ties that enabled the exchange of literary ideas. In particular, this session focuses on how the natural environment, both landscapes and seascapes, enters medieval English and Icelandic romance.

As our respondent for this session, Basil Arnould Price brings a well-grounded knowledge of Middle English and Medieval Icelandic romance, which will broaden the session's discourse of English and Icelandic romance beyond its primary environmental focus, especially in terms of Basil's own specialism in critical race theory and gender. Moreover, Basil's response will actively draw together the findings of the session's two papers, finding their similarities and differences and drawing these out for the benefit of the session attendees. We believe that this response is integral to our comparative methodology across both of our sessions; not only do we seek to encourage comparative approaches to the various disciplines of study of medieval England and Iceland, but we also seek to encourage a comparative and connective understanding of the ideas presented in this session.

Session

216
TitleDefining Community and Agency in the Medieval Built Environment
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserKara Morrow, Department of Art & Art History, College of Wooster, Ohio
 
Moderator/ChairHeather Colleen Bruhn, Department of Art History, Pennsylvania State University
 
Paper -a Outside London's Guilds: Citizens and Foreigners Building Henry VIII's Hampton Court Chapel
(Language: English)
Charlotte Stanford, Department of Comparative Arts & Letters, Brigham Young University, Utah
Paper -b Space and Spiritual Presence at Sainte Croix-Poitiers
(Language: English)
Margaret Pappano, Department of English, Queen's University, Ontario
 
AbstractMedieval urban spaces were often unified by city walls, but also subdivided within those enclosures into myriad territories. Parishes demarcated urban spaces, and those communities could be additionally informed by ecclesiastical boundaries, such as those between convents and collegiate churches. Even in the smallest walled communities, clear boundaries existed between different zones of authority. This session addresses the notion of community and agency within borders within boundaries, subdivisions within unified spaces, and the ways in which those liminal zones could be crossed, transgressed, enforced, rejected, and/or otherwise exploited in funerary and corporate contexts.

Session

1132
TitleDefining the Boundaries of Female Rulership, II: Diplomatic Networks
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserMegan Welton, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
 
Moderator/ChairElena Woodacre, Department of History, University of Winchester
 
RespondentMegan Welton, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
 
Paper -a Establishing Just Rule: Duplicate Charters and the Negotiations of the Ottonian Dominae imperiales
(Language: English)
Sarah Greer, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Paper -b Tracing the Queen's Share in Rulership: A Comparative Analysis of Charters from 11th-Century England and Germany
(Language: English)
Johanna Wittmann, Historisches Institut, Universität Duisburg-Essen
 
AbstractThis second session explores the possibilities - and problems - which medieval women faced in accessing and wielding power as rulers. Scholarship on medieval female rulers tends to highlight isolated cases of powerful individuals. Instead, the two papers in this session consider the ability of women to collaborate and work collectively to achieve their aims with both male and female counterparts. To conclude, our respondent will draw together the themes touched on by all our speakers and contemplate potential next steps for the study of medieval female power.

Session

1024
TitleHebrew Manuscripts and Their Margins, I: The Margins of Science
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2022: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorCentre for Jewish Studies, University of Leeds
 
OrganiserEva Frojmovic, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies / Centre for Jewish Studies / Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Moderator/ChairEva Frojmovic, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies / Centre for Jewish Studies / Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Paper -a Copying Mistakes or Mistaken Copyists: On the Interplay between Text and Diagrams in the Sefer ha-Mar'im
(Language: English)
Sabine Arndt, Institut für Jüdische Studien, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Paper -b Written on Your Palm: Diagrams of the Human Hand in Jewish Manuscripts and Early Printed Books
(Language: English)
Zsófia Buda, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester
 
AbstractThe session will investigate the margins of Hebrew mss for paratext, annotation, censorship and other uses that determine the margin's function as a visual-textual border area.

Session

239
TitleIndecent Theologies, II: Phalluses, Virgins, Saints, and Other Average Indecencies
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorInstitutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
 
OrganiserDavid Carrillo-Rangel, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Sophie Sexon, School of Critical Studies (English Language & Linguistics), University of Glasgow
 
Moderator/ChairSophie Sexon, School of Critical Studies (English Language & Linguistics), University of Glasgow
 
RespondentMichelle M. Sauer, Department of English, University of North Dakota
 
Paper -a The Miraculous Penis
(Language: English)
Joanna Augustyn, Instytut Literaturoznawstwa, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu
Paper -b Contagion, Panic, Shame: Modern Transphobia’s Medieval Resonances
(Language: English)
C. Libby, Department of Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Pennsylvania State University
 
AbstractIndecent Theology, as coined by Marcella Althaus-Reid (2000), is a theological perspective which radically perverts accepted doctrines in sex, gender, and politics and re-establishes their borders. Medieval and early modern theology and history becomes a place for prospective non-normative discourses because this affective theology disturbs the borders of decent, historical constructs, and indecent, to visualise otherness. In this session we aim to critically reflect on sexuality and phallocentrism, bringing theology out of the closet, centring indecency in religious perspectives.

Session

339
TitleIndecent Theologies, III: No Gods, No Masters
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorInstitutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
 
OrganiserDavid Carrillo-Rangel, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Sophie Sexon, School of Critical Studies (English Language & Linguistics), University of Glasgow
 
Moderator/ChairDavid Carrillo-Rangel, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
 
RespondentRoberta Magnani, Department of English Literature & Creative Writing, Swansea University
 
Paper -a Julian of Norwich and Indecency in the Anchorhold: Blood Lust and Body Doubling
(Language: English)
Sophie Sexon, School of Critical Studies (English Language & Linguistics), University of Glasgow
Paper -b 'Defined as flesh by flesh-loathers': An Ecclesiastic, Somatic, Erotic Tour through Polydore Vergil's Sacred History
(Language: English)
Cleo Madeleine, School of Literature, Drama & Creative Writing, University of East Anglia
 
AbstractIndecent Theology, as coined by Marcella Althaus-Reid (2000), is a theological perspective which radically perverts accepted doctrines in sex, gender, and politics and re-establishes their borders. Medieval and early modern theology and history becomes a place for prospective non-normative discourses because this affective theology disturbs the borders of decent, historical constructs, and indecent, to visualise otherness. In this session we refuse to acknowledge concepts of sex and power to show te opportunities of flesh, sensuality and desire. If History has cheated on us, we aim to eroticise genres and genders.

Session

112
TitleMaking Meaning through Religious Painting and Ecclesiastical Interiors
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairLivia Lupi, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
 
Paper -a 'The Times They Are a-Changing': An Examination of Giotto's Crucifix and Masaccio's Trinity in the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella, Florence
(Language: English)
Linda Steele, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa
Paper -b Sculptural Decoration of the Church of Resurrection in Jerusalem as the Identification of the Christian Communities Guarding the Holy Sepulchre in the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Elena Lavrenteva, Faculty of History & Philology, Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Alfred Acres defines mundane/worldly time as the temporal passage of years or moments that are depicted on one plane of existence. It is a concrete narrative that occurs in a singular dimension. However, the discourse of Christian time is not as easily discerned and occurs on a multi-layered plane. By utilising the frameworks provided by St Augustine and others, I will examine Giotto's Crucifix and Masaccio's Trinity at the Basilica of Santa Maria Novella. I will investigate the uses of naturalism by artists that illustrate the concept of collapsing time within an image. Augustine's premise is that time, within Christian theology, exists on one plane, not on three. As with the Holy Trinity, time collapses into a singular being, with past, present, and future, for the purposes of Christian interpretation and theology, collapse into one existence.

Paper -b:
The aim of the research is to consider the sculptural decoration of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre as the identification of the Christian communities guarding the Holy Shrine in the 12th century. According to written sources the monastic communities of Greeks, Georgians, Armenians, Copts, and Syrians settled near the shrine with the right to serve the liturgy on the Holy Sepulchre and Golgotha already in the 9th century, during the Abbasid Caliphate (it is quite possible they were present at an earlier time, but no direct evidence has been preserved). Every time the Church was restored, craftspeople from different places and of various Christian communities were involved. Thus, the architectural appearance of the shrine became an incredible patchwork quilt of capitals, moldings, friezes, voussoirs, lintels.

Session

1539
TitleNicholas of Cusa, I: Cusa's De visione Dei in Perspective
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorCusanus Society of UK & Ireland
 
OrganiserSimon Burton, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh
 
Moderator/ChairWilliam P. Hyland, School of Divinity, University of St Andrews
 
RespondentSimon Burton, School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh
 
Paper -a Elements for a Social Constructivist Pedagogy in Nicholas of Cusa's De visione Dei
(Language: English)
Greta Venturelli, Dipartimento di Filosofia e Scienze dell'Educazione, Università degli studi di Torino
Paper -b Nicholas of Cusa's De visione Dei: Origin and Effect
(Language: English)
Monika Veronika Eisenhauer, Independent Scholar, Zwingenberg
 
AbstractNicholas of Cusa's De Visione Dei is one of the most important mystical works of the Late Middle Ages. It has long fascinated scholars for its ground-breaking treatment of themes of vision, perspective, and community in the mystical ascent, as well as its emphasis on the individual in their relationship to God. The papers in this session seek to offer new approaches to this seminal work, bridging sociology, metaphysics, and theology.

Session

315
TitleRethinking the Medieval Frontier, II: Making (Up) the Frontier
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorRethinking the Medieval Frontier Network
 
OrganiserJonathan Jarrett, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
Moderator/ChairRodrigo García-Velasco Bernal, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
 
RespondentCatarina Madureira Villamariz, Vidro e Cerâmica para as Artes (VICARTE), Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa
 
Paper -a Understanding Mughal State Formation across the Bengal Frontier
(Language: English)
Aniket Tathagata Chettry, Siliguri College, North Bengal University
Paper -b Making and Unmaking Borders in Muslim and Christian Iberia
(Language: English)
Jonathan Jarrett, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
 
AbstractThe project Rethinking the Medieval Frontier has been presenting comparative research on frontier spaces and practices at the IMC since 2015. This session mounts a broad comparative of the political construction of frontiers in early Mughal India and the emplacement of frontiers in social practice in the Christian-Muslim boundary zone of the medieval Iberian Peninsula. The session and the previous one will be wrapped up by a response considering such frontiers of practice from the point of view of religion.

Session

1625
TitleTransforming Borders in Late Antiquity: A Panoramic View, IV - North Africa & Conclusion
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserJakob Riemenschneider, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
 
Moderator/ChairRobin Whelan, Department of History, University of Liverpool
 
RespondentWalter Pohl, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Philipp von Rummel, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (DAI), Berlin
 
Paper -a Written in the Desert: Organisational and Infrastructural Matters in the Bu Njem Ostraca
(Language: English)
Hanna Fritz, Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altorientalistik, Universität Innsbruck
Paper -b Changing Borders in North Africa: From the Byzantine to the Arabian Fortifications
(Language: English)
Philipp Margreiter, Graduiertenkolleg 2304 'Byzanz und die euromediterranen Kriegskulturen: Austausch, Abgrenzung und Rezeption', Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz / Institut für Archäologie, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
 
AbstractThese sessions offer an archaeological as well as historical approach to Roman border regions. We define these territories as complex areas of interaction, combining both Roman and non-Roman elements, differing from the Imperium and the Barbaricum. Frontier zones and societies saw a specific regional and local milieu in the Near East, North Africa, or along the Danube and the Rhine. Are there supra-regional similarities, are the socio-political conditions all too different?

Session

1730
TitleTrust across Borders, II
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2022: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserAnnabel Hancock, St John's College, University of Oxford
Siyao Jiang, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
 
Moderator/ChairJustyna Wubs-Mrozewicz, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, Universiteit van Amsterdam
 
RespondentCatherine Holmes, Faculty of History, University of Oxford / The English Historical Review
Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz, Amsterdam School of Historical Studies, Universiteit van Amsterdam
 
Paper -a The Limits of Collaboration: Inter-Communal Commercial Agreements in Mozarabic Toledo
(Language: English)
Helen Flatley, Faculty of History, University of Oxford / School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper -b 'Yeve credens to her': Credit and Credibility in The Book of Margery Kempe
(Language: English)
Nancy Haijiang Jiang, Department of English, Northwestern University, Illinois
 
AbstractThe second of two sessions exploring historical trust, this panel looks at trust in local contexts. The first paper examines inter-communal trust in Mozarabic Toledo, seeking to investigate the ways in which trust was established across communal boundaries and what happened when that trust broke down. The second paper explores how Margery Kempe used credit practices to reinforce her spiritual credibility and generate trust between her, her supporters, and her readers, in order to cultivate her own penitential credit network that stretched across regions and even nations. As a third paper in this session, we will have a response from the moderator to open the discussion.

Session

101
TitleVisual Language, Knowledge, and Power
Date/TimeMonday 4 July 2022: 11.15-12.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairClaire Renkin, Yarra Theological Union, University of Divinity, Box Hill, Victoria
 
Paper -a The Wolf: A Warrior Symbol from Eastern to Western Europe
(Language: English)
Alexandra Costache-Babcinschi, Departamentul de Limbi Moderne și Comunicare în Afaceri, Facultatea de Relații Economice Internaționale, Academia de Studii Economice din București
Paper -b The Imperial Theology of the Cult of the Mother of God in Byzantium, Hungary, and the Kyivan Rus'
(Language: English)
Sándor Földvári, Faculty of Humanities, University of Debrecen
 
AbstractPaper -a:
Animal symbolism is both rich and intricate in European mythology, folklore, iconography, and vernacular texts. The wolf is one of the most common images appearing from East to West. Its representations are neither simple nor homogeneous though; their variety and complexity demand thorough research and subtle understanding. The wolf-warrior is only one of the multiple portraits of the wolf as recorded through late Antiquity and to the Fall of Constantinople. Our paper will focus on such illustrations as can be traced in the several geographical areas from the borders of medieval Christianity. The British Isles, France, Wallachia, Moldavia, and Transylvania are some of the regions that will make our centre of attention.

Paper -b:
Various types of icons were symbols of the various and different cults of the Mother of God. The counterpoint of the imperial cult and the church (monastic) cult by the different rules of types of the icons of the Holy Virgin: the Hodegetria icon, which depicts the Mother showing to the Child who is 'the way, the truth and the life' (John 14:6), was carried in the processions on the church feasts of the Mother of God; conversely, the other types of Theotokos-icons those depicted the Mother as non-showing the child (such as the Orans, the most ancient type of the Mary-icons), according to Pentcheva, 2006. The Orans was named Blachernitissa because it hung on the gate of the Blachernai-palace of the emperors (Kondakov, 1915), which symbolized the imperial power. The 'daughters' of the Byzantine culture inherited the cult of icons of the Mother of God as the embodiment of the imperial power; it is clearly reflected by the huge Orans-icon in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kyiv, Ukraine, which does not have any child on the belly but is depicted as an Empress in purple slippers, having purple girdle (Stepovik 2008). Offering the state to the Mother of God: it was a special act done by the first king of Hungary, Stephen I (Saint) in 1038 on Byzantine pattern, and it got an interpretation in the emphasised Byzantine spirit in the time of reign Béla III, who was brought in the court of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I, and built the gate 'Porta Speciosa', with a mosaic on Byzantine pattern depicting offering the state to Mary (Földvári, 2018).