Call for Papers: IMC 2023 – Networks & Entanglements

Call for Papers

Special thematic strand: 'Networks & Entanglements', 3-6 July 2023

Postcard advertising the Leeds International Medieval Congress, 3-6 July 2023 Call for Papers. The Special Thematic Strand in 2023 will be Networks and Entanglements. The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper proposals must be submitted by 31 August 2022, Session proposals must be submitted by 30 September 2022. The online proposal forms will be available from 31 May 2022. For more information, please visit www.imc.leeds.ac.uk

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus. In 2023 this is ‘Networks and Entanglements’.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus. In 2023, this is ‘Networks and Entanglements’.

‘Networks’ have become a much-employed term in the connected world of the 21st century, and also in scholarship. Historical studies, including medieval studies, have adapted concepts from sociology and digital tools to survey, visualise, and analyse the webs of interaction and relations among individuals, groups, places, artefacts, or polities. These notions emerge from a far-reaching relational approach across disciplines. Networks thus emerge from, or are defined as, multifaceted interdependencies. They highlight linkages between the human and non-human sphere, akin to how medieval people perceived manifold connections between the macro- and the microcosm. ‘Networks’ can address all kinds of relationships, connections, and correlations, their manifestations and structures, dynamics, and limits.

‘Entanglements’ is a term originally employed in studies of materiality to capture mutual dependencies between humans, artefacts, and sites in a fuzzier, but more flexible way. It has a key role in understanding complex connections, correlations, and relationships of diverse groups and cultures. Along similar lines, we invite medievalists of all fields to reflect upon linkages between individuals, groups, communities, and other bodies in various social and intellectual contexts, between humans, localities, and objects, between various species and ecologies, between motifs and iconographies, or between religious ideas, philosophical concepts, and narratives as networks of knowledge production. Especially welcome are attempts to entangle these various spheres, linking disciplines and methods, be they qualitative or quantitative, digital, or non-digital, or coming from archaeology, art history, linguistics, philology, history, or environmental, intellectual, literary, and religious studies.

Themes to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

  • Social, economic, or political networks within and between medieval societies
  • Intellectual communities and networks of knowledge
  • Religious networks and formations
  • Spatial networks, architectures, and infrastructures
  • Ecologies of connected, related, and entangled species
  • Entanglements through artefacts and communities of practice and consumption
  • Artistic networks and entangled iconographies and soundscapes
  • Medieval and modern concepts of connectivity and interdependency
  • Medieval and modern visualisations of entanglements and networks
  • Medieval practices of networking
  • Transnational, transregional, and trans-border networks
  • Entanglements between the global and the local
  • Narrative networks, literary and imagined entanglements
  • Networks, mobilities, circulations, and flows, both real and fictitious
  • Gendered networks: interconnections, relationships, and entanglements
  • Network constraints, rules, and social roles
  • Inclusion and exclusion through networks
  • Identities, ego-networks, and emotional communities
  • Network theory and complexity in medieval studies
  • Digital humanities, linked data, and data ontologies
  • Networks and networking in medieval scholarship past and present
  • Ranges, limits, stability, and fragility of networks

The IMC welcomes session and paper proposals submitted in all major languages.

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Networks and Entanglements‘ will be co-ordinated by Johannes Preiser-Kapeller (Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien).

Find Calls for Papers

Check out our curated Twitter moment of Calls for Papers for IMC sessions or round tables here.

How to Submit

Don’t forget to read our  Participation and Acceptance Criteria before submitting your paper or session proposal. 

Submit your Paper, Session or Round Table proposal here.

Paper proposal deadline: 31 August 2022

Session proposal deadline: 30 September 2022

Format: Coronavirus restrictions permitting, we are planning to host an in-person gathering in Leeds, with virtual involvement possible for those who are unable to attend in person.

You will be asked when submitting your proposal about whether you would prefer to present your paper or session in-person or virtually and we will follow-up with you following receipt of your submission to confirm this. It is important that you let us know your preference, as this information will inform our planning of both virtual and in-person elements.

You can also find out more about how to submit a paper or session proposal by reading our handy guide.

IMC Policy on Dignity and Mutual Respect, including Social Media Policy

To ensure that everyone can make the most of the academic, networking, and social opportunities that the IMC offers, the organisers expect all delegates, exhibitors and staff to adhere to our Dignity and Mutual Respect Policy at all conference venues and conference-related social events, as well as online and in any form of social media.