IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 1109: Ancient Latin, Medieval Latin, Modern Latin: Continuities

Wednesday 16 July 2003, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:University of Kentucky Institute for Latin Studies
Organiser:Terence Tunberg, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Moderator/Chair:John B. Dillon, Memorial Library, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Paper 1109-aDe Bernardi Silvestris Cosmographiae indole poetica et philosophica (Bernardus Silvestris' Cosmographia Between Poetry and Philosophy)
(Language: Latina)
Milena Minkova, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Philosophy
Paper 1109-bDe Erasmo operum Latinorum medio aevo compositorum lectore (On Erasmus as a Reader of Medieval Latin Works)
(Language: Latina)
Terence Tunberg, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1109-cIn Instituto Studiis Latinis Provehendis Kentukiano quo modo et qua ratione auctores Latini mediaevales tractentur et explicentur (The Place of Medieval Latin Authors in the Institute for Latin Studies at the University of Kentucky)
(Language: English)
Terence Tunberg, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Milena Minkova, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Abstract

Each paper will highlight ways in which medieval Latin text(s) exhibit continuities with Latin works of other periods, both ancient and more recent. Each of the papers will be delivered in Latin, exemplifying a continuity right up to the present. The papers will be followed by a brief epilogue delivered by professors Minkova and Tunberg, which explains how the theme of the session illustrates one aspect of the post-graduate training in Latin offered by the Institute for Latin Studies at the University of Kentucky, in which Latin works of all periods, including the medieval period, are intensively studied, and Latin is used as the language of instruction, oral interaction, analysis and written assignments.