IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 113: Religious Women Expressing Normative Authority, I

Monday 14 July 2003, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Maiju Lehmijoki-Gardner, Department of Theology, Loyola University Maryland / Department of Church History, University of Helsinki
Moderator/Chair:Maiju Lehmijoki-Gardner, Department of Theology, Loyola University Maryland / Department of Church History, University of Helsinki
Paper 113-b'Why Me?': Birgitta of Sweden's Self-Authorization in the Regula Salvatoris
(Language: English)
Päivi Salmesvuori, Department of Church History, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 113-cClare's Formula vitae: Negotiating Authority in the Franciscan Order
(Language: English)
Lezlie Knox, Department of History, Marquette University, Wisconsin
Index terms: Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

These three sessions address the ways in which medieval women were able to exercise normative authority within their religious communities. Traditionally the writing of rules (“regulae”) and other normative texts are seen as products of hierachical, clerical authority. The sessions “Religious Women Expressing Normative Authority” suggest that women were actively involved in the matters concerning their own ways of religious life; they could take part in the creation of the rules and other normative texts by soliciting them, by looking at ways to adapt universal rules to their particular needs or choosing to ignore some forms of legislation, and even by participating directly in the writing of the rules and other texts offering religious guidance.