IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 120: Bishops and/as Counts in 11th- and 12th-Century Lotharingia and Germany: Session in Memory of Timothy Reuter

Monday 14 July 2003, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Arnoud-Jan A. Bijsterveld, Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen, Universiteit van Tilburg
Brigitte Meijns, Department of History, KU Leuven
Moderator/Chair:Brigitte Meijns, Department of History, KU Leuven
Paper 120-aBishops as Counts and Counts as Bishops: Liège and Utrecht, 11th Century
(Language: English)
Arnoud-Jan A. Bijsterveld, Faculteit Sociale Wetenschappen, Universiteit van Tilburg
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 120-cGerman Bishops at War, 1152-1190
(Language: English)
Holger Berwinkel, Institut für mittelalterliche Geschichte, Philipps-Universität, Marburg
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The Central Middle Ages (10th-12th centuries) constitute the age of both close cooperation and fierce struggle between Church and State. Especially in Germany and Lotharinga bishops held pivotal positions in both. They received comital power and became counts in their own right. They led armies and in the artistic representation of their function they had themselves depicted as secular rulers. Their close ties with kings, dukes, counts and regional aristocracy made them privileged intermediaries between ecclesiastical and secular power. In this session, we highlight several examples of the exercise of ‘secular’ power by bishops, as well as the ways they and their fellow aristocrats had themselves depicted in funerary monuments after their deaths.