IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 501: Claiming Europe's Barbarians: Archaeology, Anthropology and Identity from 1830 to 1930

Tuesday 15 July 2003, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Bonnie Effros, Department of History, State University of New York, Binghamton
Moderator/Chair:Guy Halsall, Department of History, University of York
Paper 501-aAnglo-Saxonism and Archaeology in 19th-Century Britain
(Language: English)
Howard Williams, School of History & Archaeology, Cardiff University
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Art History - General, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 501-bAmateurs No Longer?: The Professionalization of Merovingian Archaeology in 19th-Century France
(Language: English)
Bonnie Effros, Department of History, State University of New York, Binghamton
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Art History - General, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 501-cFrom Virchow to Kossinna: Changes in German Prehistory around 1900
(Language: English)
Sebastian Brather, Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte und Archäologie des Mittelalters, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - General, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

The development of the disciplines of anthropology and archaeology in the 19th century changed the way in which scholars and the general public viewed the early Middle Ages. These methodologies, which were shaped by an era of growing nationalism as well as prevalent Romanticism, allowed material artefacts and human remains to be included as sources for the early medieval period. These three papers, one on England, one on France, and one on Germany, will address various facets of the impact of these emerging disciplines on contemporary understanding of the Dark Ages.