IMC 2003: Sessions

Session 822: Medieval Kinship Reconsidered, II

Tuesday 15 July 2003, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Unit for Prosopographical Research, Linacre College, Oxford
Organiser:Katharine Keats-Rohan, Unit for Prosopographical Research, Linacre College, University of Oxford
Moderator/Chair:Katharine Keats-Rohan, Unit for Prosopographical Research, Linacre College, University of Oxford
Paper 822-aKin and King in the Carolingian Empire
(Language: English)
Jinty Nelson, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 822-bBerengerius's Gift: Networks and Overlapping Claims in 11th- and 12th-Century Anjou
(Language: English)
Kim Esmark, Department of History & Social Theory, Roskilde Universitet
Index terms: Anthropology, Social History
Paper 822-c'Like a Son towards his Father, Like a Retainer towards his Lord, Like a Disciple towards his Master': Structures of Power and Parentage in the Learned Milieux of 10th- to 12th-Century Europe
(Language: English)
Mia Münster-Swendsen, Department of History, Københavns Universitet
Index terms: Education, Law, Mentalities, Sexuality, Social History
Abstract

This session, the second of two on the subject, aims to reassess the role and functions that have traditionally been assigned to European kinship in the early and high Middle Ages. There can be no doubt that kinship played an important part in medieval power structures; but recent research makes it desirable to reconsider both the paramount importance that has been attributed to this factor in early medieval societies, and the widespread assumption that the Church and kings strove to weaken and dissolve kinship solidarities in order to strengthen their own power.