IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1011: Clash of Cultures: Hidden Persuaders?

Wednesday 14 July 2004, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Annick Boulogne, Centre Interuniversitaire d'Histoire et d'Archéologie Médiévales (UMR 5648), Université Lumière Lyon II / École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Moderator/Chair:Len Scales, Department of History, Durham University
Paper 1011-aFrom Crusader Jerusalem to Anglo-Norman England: Searching for Similarities in the Construction of a 'New Self'
(Language: English)
Nicole Nyffenegger, Institut für Englische Sprachen & Literaturen, Universität Bern
Paper 1011-bThe King's Blood: Royal Genealogies and Dynastic Rivalry during the Hundred Years War
(Language: English)
Marigold Anne Norbye, Department of History, University College London
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French/ Occitan, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1011-cFabricating a Dual National Identity: The Clash between the Lords of the Isles and the Scottish Crown
(Language: English)
Annick Boulogne, Centre Interuniversitaire d'Histoire et d'Archéologie Médiévales (UMR 5648), Université Lumière Lyon II / École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Local History, Political Thought
Abstract

How were cultural differences exaggerated to justify conflicts of authority? The first paper demonstrates that the arguments based upon heresy and crusade which were used to legitimate the disinheritance of Conradin of Hohenstaufen in the mid-13th century conflicted with northern French conceptions of inheritance. The second paper explores how the ‘objective facts’ contained in royal genealogies were distorted to justify each side’s claim to the French throne during the Hundred Years War. The third paper suggests that the well-known clash between Highlanders and Lowlanders in late-medieval Scotland in reality disguised a territorial dispute between two essentially similar communities.