IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1108: Pigeonholes Past and Present: Interplay between Medieval and Modern Ethnographic Models

Wednesday 14 July 2004, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Marianne O'Doherty, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Philip A. Shaw, School of English Literature, Language & Linguistics, University of Sheffield
Moderator/Chair:Orietta Da Rold, School of English, University of Leicester
Paper 1108-aThe Ivanhoe Ideal: Imposing 19th-Century Ethnic Categories on Anglo-Norman England
(Language: English)
Philip A. Shaw, School of English Literature, Language & Linguistics, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French/ Occitan, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 1108-bHistory, Past Races, and the Ethnicity of Elves
(Language: English)
Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities
Paper 1108-c14th-Century 'Ethnographies' of India: Readings Medieval and Modern
(Language: English)
Marianne O'Doherty, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Comparative, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities
Abstract

This session examines the relations between medieval and post-medieval models for understanding ethnicity and ethnography. Paper A discusses how Anglo-Norman literature dealt with ethnicity and considers nineteenth-century literary and scholarly (mis)appropriations of its ethnic categories. Paper B looks at the blurring of the concepts of the ‘ethnic other’ and the ‘supernatural being’ in medieval Scandinavian and other north-west European historiography relating to invasion and colonisation. Paper C focuses on the reactions of fourteenth-century readers of travel writing to constructions of Indian peoples and questions the usefulness of late twentieth-century concepts of otherness in understanding such ethnographic fictions.