IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1113: Clash of Cultures, 1204

Wednesday 14 July 2004, 11.15-12.45

Moderator/Chair:Liz James, Department of Art History, University of Sussex
Paper -wdSecular Versus Religious
(Language: English)
Emelia Yeboah-Addo, Integrity, Ethics & Discipline Foundation, Ghana
Index terms: Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1113-cMasculinity versus Femininity
(Language: English)
Michael Kudjo Mensah, Independent Scholar, Ghana
Index terms: Gender Studies, Sexuality
Abstract

grouped by Liz James 24-10-03:
Abstract paper a
On 12 April,1204, when Alexios V (Doukas) was attacked in Constantinople, there was a massive looting of the most precious and culturally symbolic treasures which were all either destroyed or stolen for good. In fact, the booty was so huge and great so that it cannot be compared to any other fallen kingdom’s wealth in world history, the implications of this culturally significant event and its accompanying activities which witnessed such great objects like statues, liturgical vestments and other precious materials connot be underestimated in terms of the amount of influence which they brought to bear on the cultures of the people and nations who were involved this great events.

Abstract paper b
The challenge between the ecclesiastical and secular world has its roots deeply embeded in the Middle Ages (1204). Secularization was especially very significant; for instance, the papacy’s attempt to control and consecret the secular states failed woefully. By 1500 the secular Power exerted a greater degree of control over the church in the northern parts of europethan it’s precursors in the 1200. But in some parts of Europe the monarchy influence was so dominant over the ecclesiastical appointments and privileges, rulers were obliged to protect and support the church within their lands. The struggle between ecclesiastical and papal power manifested in many ways: insignia etc.

Abstract paper c
The challenge between the ecclesiastical and secular world has its roots deeply embeded in the Middle Ages (1204). Secularization was especially very significant; for instance, the papacy’s attempt to control and consecret the secular states failed woefully. By 1500 the secular Power exerted a greater degree of control over the church in the northern parts of europethan it’s precursors in the 1200. But in some parts of Europe the monarchy influence was so dominant over the ecclesiastical appointments and privileges, rulers were obliged to protect and support the church within their lands. The struggle between ecclesiastical and papal power manifested in many ways: insignia etc.