IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 113: Iberian Cultural Clashes, 11th-13th Centuries

Monday 12 July 2004, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Hugo von Sankt Viktor-Institut, Frankfurt am Main
Organiser:Matthias Martin Tischler, Hugo von Sankt Viktor-Institut, Philosophisch-Theologische Hochschule Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt am Main
Moderator/Chair:Christine Feld, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge
Paper 113-aRodrigo Jiménez Rada and his Historia Arabum
(Language: English)
Matthias Maser, Institut für mittelalterliche Geschichte, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic & Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 113-bManners of Literary Behaviour in Christian-Muslim Approaches
(Language: English)
Matthias Martin Tischler, Hugo von Sankt Viktor-Institut, Philosophisch-Theologische Hochschule Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Islamic & Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 113-cIntegration or Exclusion of Judaism?: Apologetic Strategies in Ramón Lull
(Language: English)
Wolfram Drews, Franz Joseph Dölger-Institut zur Erforschung der Spätantike, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Bonn
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

During the Middle Ages, the Iberian Peninsula haas been a region of contact, of permanent cultural approach, exchange, and conflict. The golden age of these cultural interferences was the period from the 11th to the 13th centuries. The political and military and the structural changes of the church since the 11th century developed into forms of Holy War, on the Christian as well as on th Muslim side. These changes of climate in politics and warfare had their impact also on the Jews living in Christian and Muslim spheres. The shifts of power led to many different constellations of super- and ssubordiantion of the adherents of the main religions among each other. On the Christian side, important input resulted from the growing interest by the rest of Europe, led by the papacy, which made possible exchanges of new ideas and new cultural as well as ecclesiastical expressions. Latin Europe took over ideas from Spain, whilethe Iberian Peninsula profited from ideas and forms of organisation from the rest of Europe. Choosing three topics from this time, the session will try to look at the relationship between Christian groups and between Christians, Muslims and Jews and vice versa. By this, we will try to establish parameters for a description of zones of religious and cultural contact and conflict like the Iberian Penisula.