IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1311: Devils they Knew?: War and the Cultural Frontier in the Middle Ages, II

Wednesday 14 July 2004, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department of History, University of Durham
Organiser:Len Scales, Department of History, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Len Scales, Department of History, Durham University
Paper 1311-aMaking a New Enemy 'Auld'?: Evolving Scottish Perceptions of the English in 14th-Century Chronicles and Records
(Language: English)
Michael Penman, Department of History, University of Stirling
Index terms: Mentalities, Military History, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1311-bThe King's Scottish Enemies and Rebels: Identity, Enmity, and Allegiance on the English Marches against Scotland, 1296-1307
(Language: English)
Andy King, Department of History, University of Southampton
Index terms: Mentalities, Military History, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1311-cA United Front?: Conceptions of the 'Stranger' on the Tudor Anglo-Scottish Marches
(Language: English)
Claire Etty, Department of History, University of Durham
Index terms: Mentalities, Military History, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Our topic connects directly with the IMC’s theme for 2004: ‘Clash of Cultures’. We aim to explore some of the ways in which war sustained – or complicated, or undercut – representations of the cultural ‘other’ during the Middle Ages. Questions informing our two sessions include: How important were group stereotypes in identifying enemies? Were opponents treated as fundamentally alien, or were underlying similarities perceived and emphasized?