IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1321: Scotus and his Predecessors at the University of Paris

Wednesday 14 July 2004, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Peter S. Eardley, Department of Philosophy, University of Guelph, Ontario
Carl N. Still, St Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan
Moderator/Chair:Ian Richard Netton, Department of Arabic & Middle Eastern Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1321-bGiles of Rome and Scotus on the Intellect as a Natural Power
(Language: English)
Peter S. Eardley, Department of Philosophy, University of Guelph, Ontario
Index terms: Philosophy
Paper 1321-cSpecies and Representation in Aquinas and Scotus
(Language: English)
Carl N. Still, St Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan
Index terms: Philosophy
Abstract

Nest to Ockham, John Duns Scotus (ca. 1266-1308) is often recognized to be the great innovator, or at least an important transitional figure, in medieval philosophy. His understanding of the will, his unique approach to the principle of individuation, and his understanding of metaphysics as a science of transcendentals are all thought to have inaugurated new directions in the history of philosophy. The purpose of this session is to glance backward, as it were, rather than forward, in order to gain insight into Scotus’ relationship to his immediate predecessors at the University of Paris.