IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1511: Exploring Cultural Transition in Early Medieval England

Thursday 15 July 2004, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Hilton Shepherd Postgraduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Birmingham
Organisers:John Baker, Department of Medieval History, University of Birmingham
Duncan Probert, Hilton Shepherd Postgraduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Alan Thacker, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Paper 1511-aProblems of Language Change in South-West England
(Language: English)
Duncan Probert, Hilton Shepherd Postgraduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Language and Literature - Comparative, Onomastics
Paper 1511-bBritish to Anglo-Saxon Transition in South-East England
(Language: English)
John Baker, Department of Medieval History, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Onomastics
Paper 1511-cFrom British to English Christianity: Deconstructing Bede's Interpretation of the Conversion
(Language: English)
Nicholas Brooks, Department of History, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Ecclesiastical History, Geography and Settlement Studies, Onomastics
Abstract

It is increasingly clear that considerable local and regional variations existed in the nature and time-scale of the transition from post-Roman British to Anglo-Saxon society in what eventually became England. Cultural obliteration models are now regarded as suspect by most historians, archaeologists and toponymists, but the various theories of more (or at least partially) peaceful cultural fusion have yet to explain, for example, the almost total failure of the Britons to leave an impression on the English language. Are we dealing with a process of acculturation or a ‘clash of cultures’?