IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 1611: The Clash of Cultures in the Political Identity of Medieval Europe

Thursday 15 July 2004, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Dwight D. Allman, Department of Political Sciences, Baylor University, Texas
Moderator/Chair:Cary J. Nederman, Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University, College Station
Paper 1611-aGreek Conceptions of the Imperfect Regimes in Latin Political Philosophy
(Language: English)
Cary J. Nederman, Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University, College Station
Index terms: Political Thought
Paper 1611-bPolitics as a Vocation: The Soul in Medieval European Conceptions of Civic Life
(Language: English)
Dwight D. Allman, Department of Political Sciences, Baylor University, Texas
Index terms: Political Thought
Paper 1611-cJoachim of Fiore and the Apocalyptic Perception of Islam
(Language: English)
Matthias Riedl, Politische Wissenschaft, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Erlangen-Nürnber
Index terms: Political Thought
Abstract

This panel explores rival cultural influences shaping conceptualizations of political life in medieval Europe. The panel brings together two Americans and a European to examine, in turn, the ways in which Christian apocalyptic perceptions of Islam influenced the political self-conception of Latin Europe (Riedl); a Greek heritage—refracted through the civic-republicanism of Rome and the Latin fathers of Christian theology—of formulating the public vocation of politics in terms of ‘caring for the soul’ (Allman); and the complex process by which Greek ideas of imperfect constitutions were used and abused by Christian thinkers in Latin Europe from the 8th to 14th centuries (Nederman).