IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 604: Languages of Love and Hate, II: The Impact of the Fourth Crusade, 1200-1300

Tuesday 13 July 2004, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:SSCLE: Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East
Organisers:Matthew Bennett, Department of Communication & Applied Behavioural Science, Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst
Susan B. Edgington, Department of History of Science & Technology, Open University
Sarah Lambert, Department of Historical & Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths College, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Susan B. Edgington, Department of History of Science & Technology, Open University
Paper 604-aThe Good Jew and 'Other' Surprises
(Language: English)
Matthew Bennett, Department of Communication & Applied Behavioural Science, Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst
Index terms: Crusades, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Language and Literature - French/ Occitan, Mentalities
Paper 604-bGreeks and Latins at the Time of the Fourth Crusade: Patriarch John Kameratos and a Troubadour tenso
(Language: English)
Linda Paterson, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Crusades, Language and Literature - French/ Occitan, Sexuality
Paper 604-c13th-Century Fox, or Why Go on a Crusade?
(Language: English)
Sarah Lambert, Department of Historical & Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths College, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Folk Studies, Language and Literature - French/ Occitan, Mentalities
Abstract

By 1200, attitudes to crusading had been altered by a century of experience in many different environments. It was apparent that an assumed bi-polarity was complicated by the existence of many types of ‘other’. Persecution of Jews could be matched by tolerance. The subjection of ‘heretic’ Greeks, by the Fourth Crusaders in 1204, created an environment for cultural exchange as well as conflict. The loss of Jerusalem in 1187, and the conquest of Constantinople led to questioning of the validity of crusading and some cynical observations of the value of the activity. Old French and Occitan texts are used to explore these contradictions.