IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 715: Doomed by their Marginality: Censured Characters in Art and Thought

Tuesday 13 July 2004, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Avital Heyman, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Moderator/Chair:Avital Heyman, Department of the Arts, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Paper 715-aPunished by her Lust: Luxuria in Byzantine Art
(Language: English)
Mati Meyer, Department of Art History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Art History - General, Byzantine Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 715-bA Meeting in Hades: Diabolical Images in the Byzantine Marginal Psalters
(Language: English)
Emma Maayan-Fanar, Department of Art History, University of Haifa
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Byzantine Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 715-cA Human Antichrist in the Beatus Apocalypses: A Portrait of the Enemy?
(Language: English)
Renana Bartal, Department of Art History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index terms: Art History - General, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Abstract

Following an objective of the IMC 2004 conference, the proposed session will deal with the medieval representation of ‘the other’. Cultural attitudes toward the exemplary ‘other’ figures of Luxuria, Satan, and the Antichrist are deeply marked by ecclesiastical and eschatalogical censorship. The pictorial tradition of these morally censured anti-heroes sets their ‘otherness’ in terms of opposing poles, i.e. Luxuria versus Chastity and the Virgin; Satan and the Antichrist versus Christ. Discussing the multi-layered significances of these personages contributes to our understanding of social and moral hierarchy, which excluded and marginalized them.