IMC 2004: Sessions

Session 721: Liturgy and the Space of the Church

Tuesday 13 July 2004, 14.15-15.45

Moderator/Chair:Susan Boynton, Department of Music, Columbia University
Abstract

grouped by Susan Boynton (28/10/03):
Abstract paper a-
Jacob’s vision (Genesis 28) was a central feature of the medieval liturgy for the dedication of the Royal Abbey of St. Denis, near Paris. I will focus on the matins liturgy, where the careful incorporation of Jacob’s story calls attention to the relationships between theological concepts and the church’s symbolic program, identifying the building as an apocalyptic and eschatological landscape. The 13th-century First Ordinary of St. Denis provides an appropriate liturgical context for the church’s 12th-century building campaign; it is our earliest reliable liturgical source and, as scholars have shown, would be an accurate representation of 12th-century liturgical practices.

Abstract paper b
Around 1160, the population of Cefalú was instructed by the king to take part in the procession of the Offertory service in the cathedral, and to pray in front of the king and his father’s tomb on the way to and back from the altar. This royal arrangement also coincided with a series of architectural and decorative transformations of the cathedral. This paper will be an attempt at presenting the liturgical and artistic arrangements of William I, and at establishing how and whether these would be perceived by the inhabitants of Cefalú, which at the time were Arabs, Greeks, Jews, and Latin.

Abstract paper c

Abstract paper b
Around 1160, the population of Cefalú was instructed by the king to take part in the procession of the Offertory service in the cathedral, and to pray in front of the king and his father’s tomb on the way to and back from the altar. This royal arrangement also coincided with a series of architectural and decorative transformations of the cathedral. This paper will be an attempt at presenting the liturgical and artistic arrangements of William I, and at establishing how and whether these would be perceived by the inhabitants of Cefalú, which at the time were Arabs, Greeks, Jews, and Latin.