IMC 2005: Sessions

Session 107: Saints, Queens, and Identities in England after the Conquests

Monday 11 July 2005, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Organiser:Joanna Huntington, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Carolin M. Esser, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Paper 107-aTwo Weddings and a Conquest: Identifying Emma in the Encomium Emmae Reginae
(Language: English)
Alice D. Jorgensen, School of English, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Gender Studies, Mentalities
Paper 107-bQueens of the Wild Frontier: Turgot’s Margaret of Scotland
(Language: English)
Joanna Huntington, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Index terms: Hagiography, Mentalities
Paper 107-cFour Female Altars at One Misogynist Tomb: Saintly Co-Operation, Competition, or Conflict?
(Language: English)
Sally Crumplin, Department of Mediaeval History, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Hagiography, Monasticism
Abstract

This session considers how social and cultural identities were forged and expressed in the wake of the Danish and Norman conquests. One paper examines queenship in the aftermath of Cnut’s 1016 conquest of England and his marriage to his vanquished foe’s wife, Emma. The second paper considers the implications of the identities created for an eleventh-century queen in the early twelfth century, and the third treats of the dynamics of saintly relationships in the later twelfth century. The papers will add to our understanding of the ways in which tensions between disparate peoples and communities could be manipulated