IMC 2005: Sessions

Session 1122: Ancient Presences, I: Virgil, Ovid, and Dante

Wednesday 13 July 2005, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies, Ohio State University
Organiser:Frank T. Coulson, Department of Greek & Latin, Ohio State University
Moderator/Chair:Gregory Hays, Department of Classics, University of Virginia
Paper 1122-aVirgil and Child
(Language: English)
R. Allen Shoaf, Department of English, University of Florida
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1122-bThe Neapolitan Manuscript of the Aeneid: A Systematic Account
(Language: English)
Carlos Galego Guitian, Departamento de Filología Clásica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela
Index terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1122-cDante and the Latin Commentary Tradition on Ovid
(Language: English)
Frank T. Coulson, Department of Greek & Latin, Ohio State University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1122-dVisualizing the Classical in a Sienese Renaissance Manuscript of the Divine Comedy
(Language: English)
Benjamin David, Department of History of Art, Ohio State University
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Language and Literature - Italian, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session seeks to examine the influence of classical texts on Dante’s Commedia. The papers all use manuscript evidence (either from the commentary tradition or from manuscript illumination) to elucidate various aspects of the interconnection between Dante and his sources. Shoaf treats an illumination in MS Roma, Biblioteca Angelica 1102 to speculate on how Dante read Virgil’s poetry through shifting genders. Coulson discusses the relationship of the Latin commentary tradition on Ovid and Dante. And David examines the visualization of classicizing elements in the illuminations in a fifteenth-century Sienese manuscript of the Divine Comedy (Yates Thompson MS 36, British Library), which are heavily influenced by the 14th-century vernacular commentary known as the Ottimo Commento.