IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 101: Medieval Sermon Writing and Preaching Performances

Monday 10 July 2006, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Victoria Bristow, School of English Studies, University of Nottingham
Moderator/Chair:Mary Swan, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 101-aWulfstan's Performance of Lectio Secundum Lucam
(Language: English)
Joyce Tally Lionarons, Department of English, Ursinus College, Pennsylvania
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 101-bThe Performance Context of the Norwegian Homily Book
(Language: English)
Christopher Abram, Department of Scandinavian Studies, University College London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 101-cScripts for Preaching in Anglo-Saxon England: The Evidence of Manuscript Layout and the Booklet Format
(Language: English)
Victoria Bristow, School of English Studies, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Sermons and Preaching
Abstract

Anglo-Saxon sermons are only exceptionally labelled as records of, or scripts for, specific preaching performances, and then never unambiguously. Accounts of, or references to preaching performances in primary sources are also rare, and no single account of a preaching performance can be connected with certainty to a surviving sermon text. In other medieval literatures, explicit information is sometimes given to indicate the nature and extent of the relationship between sermon texts and preaching performances. This session will aim to generate ideas to contribute to our understanding of Anglo-Saxon literate practice and oral performance, and the relationship between them, within the context of preaching and sermon writing. An example from Old Norse literature will provide a useful comparandum to the Anglo-Saxon context.