IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 1215: Building Domesticity: New Archaeological and Historical Work on English Urban Houses, 1300-1600

Wednesday 12 July 2006, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Department of Archaeology, University of York
Organiser:Jayne A. E. Rimmer, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Jane C. Grenville, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Paper 1215-aUnam domum lapideam cum fundo: Investigating Commercial and Domestic Space in East Anglian Towns, c. 1066-1400
(Language: English)
Abby Leigh Antrobus, Department of Archaeology, University of Durham
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - General, Historiography - Medieval, Social History
Paper 1215-bPrivate Lives and Public Power: The Houses of the Civic Elite in Norwich, 1400-1600
(Language: English)
Christopher King, School of Archaeology & Ancient History, University of Leicester
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - General, Historiography - Medieval, Social History
Paper 1215-cThe Use of Documentary Sources to Identify Smaller Houses in Late Medieval York and Norwich
(Language: English)
Jayne A. E. Rimmer, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - General, Historiography - Medieval, Social History
Abstract

The aim of this session is to assemble recent doctoral research into medieval urban housing. The papers presented here take an interdisciplinary approach, showing how archaeological, documentary, and architectural sources can further our present understanding of domestic buildings. Examples of houses from across the social scale will be examined, from elite merchant’s properties to smaller dwellings. The relationship between commercial space and more private areas such as the hall will be a major theme for consideration. The synthesis of diverse examples of house-types and their inhabitants anticipates the elucidation of the concept of domesticity in an urban medieval context.