IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 1516: Belief, Devotion, Emotion, I

Thursday 13 July 2006, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Department of English, University of Aberystwyth / Canterbury Centre for Medieval & Tudor Studies, University of Kent
Organiser:Elisabeth Salter, Institute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (IMEMS) / Department of English Literature & Creative Writing, Aberystwyth University
Moderator/Chair:Andrew F. Butcher, Aberystwyth University
Paper 1516-aDirecting Sinners to Deification: Richard Rolle and De Emendatio Vitae
(Language: English)
Robin Stephen Gilbank, Department of English Literature & Creative Writing, Aberystwyth University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 1516-b'Hertes ├żat rede': Affective Reading for Reforming the Religious Self, c. 1370-1450
(Language: English)
Janet Gunning, Department of English / Department of History & Welsh History, Aberystwyth University
Index terms: Anthropology, Daily Life, Language and Literature - Middle English, Religious Life
Paper 1516-c'I crie god mercy': The Silent Reading of the Masses, c. 1450-1550
(Language: English)
Elisabeth Salter, Institute for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (IMEMS) / Department of English Literature & Creative Writing, Aberystwyth University
Index terms: Daily Life, Education, Lay Piety, Printing History
Abstract

This is one of two linked sessions exploring emotion and devotion in religious practice. This session examines devotional texts circulating in England c. 1300-1550, and the reading practices elicited by them. Gilbank examines the popularity of de emendatio Vitae, specifically Rolle’s treatment of ‘deification’ and the pedagogical implications of Emendatio‘s graduated sections on meditation, prayer and contemplation. Gunning explores how Middle English affective discourse provides a technique for acquiring specific Christian emotions and virtues as dispositions of the soul. Salter examines the creativity of the silent reading elicited by religious books widely available in print, c. 1475-1550.