IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 203: The Self before Individualisation: Positions of the 'Individual' in Relation to Self-Reference and Reference to Others

Monday 10 July 2006, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Franz-Josef Arlinghaus, Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte / Geschichte des Mittelalters, Universität Kassel
Heike Schlie, Forschungsgruppe Kulturgeschichte & Theologie des Bildes im Christentum, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster
Moderator/Chair:Michael Clanchy, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Paper 203-aInvestiture and Conscience of Medieval Self: The Case of Anselm of Canterbury
(Language: English)
Thomas M. Krüger, Abteilung Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Universität Augsburg
Index terms: Philosophy, Religious Life, Science
Paper 203-bPainting in the Late Middle Ages and the Prehistory of Individual Intellectual Property
(Language: English)
Heike Schlie, Forschungsgruppe Kulturgeschichte & Theologie des Bildes im Christentum, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - Painting
Paper 203-cLiterary Genre, Discourse, or Expression of the Self?: Italian Libri di famiglia and German Housebooks Compared
(Language: English)
Franz-Josef Arlinghaus, Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte / Geschichte des Mittelalters, Universität Kassel
Index terms: Daily Life, Education, Mentalities, Philosophy
Abstract

German research on the individual in pre-modern times rightly emphasises the differences rather than the similarities between the modern and the medieval self. It has, for instance, been pointed out that most texts in which persons talk about themselves are strongly determined by general ideas (they may be religious or regarding the class and family he / she belongs to) rather than reflecting individual attitudes. On the other hand, it is clear that the single person´s mind was not completely absorbed by those universal ideas.
Therefore, the papers of the session try to create an image of the complete otherness of the medieval self without losing it between the millstones of group mentalities and universal religious attitudes.