IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 320: Rethinking Medieval Italy, II: Rethinking Geographical Boundaries and Paths of Exchange in Medieval Italy

Monday 10 July 2006, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:George Dameron, Department of History, Saint Michael's College, Vermont
Valerie Ramseyer, Department of History, Wellesley College, Massachusetts
Moderator/Chair:George Dameron, Department of History, Saint Michael's College, Vermont
Paper 320-aDid Medieval Italy Have an East/West Divide?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Antiquity & the Middle Ages, University of Southampton
Index terms: Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 320-bMaterial Culture and Local Exchange in Apulia and Venice
(Language: English)
Tehmina Goskar, Centre for Antiquity & the Middle Ages, University of Southampton
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Economics - General, Economics - Trade
Paper 320-cMonetary Areas and Monetary Circulation in Central Italy
(Language: English)
William R. Day, Department of Coins & Medals, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban
Abstract

This panel is the second of seven (six plus one round table discussion) under the general theme, ‘Rethinking Medieval Italy’. It reconsiders traditional assumptions regarding pathways of exchange in medieval Italy. Previous historians have assumed that with regards to exchange patterns, the Italian peninsula was divided both geographically and economically into distinctive northern and southern regions, with the Apennine mountain range separating the two coastlines. This panel suggests however, that economic and material connections between the East and the West (Skinner), between the center and the regions to its north or south (Day), and between Apulia and Venice (Goskar) were far more common and important than previously assumed.