IMC 2006: Sessions

Session 720: Rethinking Medieval Italy, V: Cities and Civic Assemblies in Medieval Southern Italy - Continuity or Change?

Tuesday 11 July 2006, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:George Dameron, Department of History, Saint Michael's College, Vermont
Valerie Ramseyer, Department of History, Wellesley College, Massachusetts
Moderator/Chair:Brenda M. Bolton, University of London
Paper 720-aBari: St Nicholas and Civic Assemblies
(Language: English)
Louis Hamilton, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 720-bCivic Consciousness in Medieval Southern Italy
(Language: English)
Joanna H. Drell, Department of History, University of Richmond, Virginia
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 720-cCommunity and Citizenship in Southern Italy, c.1100-c.1200
(Language: English)
Paul Oldfield, Department of History & Economic History, Manchester Metropolitan University
Index terms: Administration, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This panel is the fifth of seven (six plus one round table discussion) under the general theme, ‘Rethinking Medieval Italy’. It re-examines why northern and southern Italy went separate ways: why did cities in southern Italy fail to become autonomous political units, as their counterparts in the north did, and what role did the Norman kings play in the stifling of cities and civic institutions? Louis Hamilton’s paper demonstrates how 11th-century Bari mimicked in many ways development in pre-communal northern cities. The papers of Paul Oldfield and Joanna Drell question whether cities in southern Italy actually lost autonomy or went into decline. Cities survived and even thrived under the Norman kings.