IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 106: Natives and Foreigners in the Late Medieval Dalmatian Communes: A Case of the Members of Elite Professions

Monday 9 July 2007, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institute of Historical Research, Croatian Academy of Sciences & Arts
Organiser:Branka Grbavac, Institute of Historical & Social Sciences, Croatian Academy of Sciences & Arts, Zagreb
Moderator/Chair:Meri Kuncic, Miroslav Krleža Lexicographical Institute, Zagreb
Paper 106-aNative and Foreign Zaratin Notaries in the 13th and the 14th Century
(Language: English)
Branka Grbavac, Institute of Historical & Social Sciences, Croatian Academy of Sciences & Arts, Zagreb
Index terms: Daily Life, Education, Law, Social History
Paper 106-bNative and Foreign Clergymen in the Late Medieval Dalmatian Communes: A Case of Zadar
(Language: English)
Zoran Ladic, Institute of Historical Research, Croatian Academy of Sciences & Arts, Zagreb
Index terms: Daily Life, Local History, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 106-cThe Artists and their Clientele in the Late Medieval Dalmatian Commune of Rab
(Language: English)
Meri Kuncic, Miroslav Krleža Lexicographical Institute, Zagreb
Index terms: Art History - General, Daily Life, Local History, Social History
Abstract

In the Late Middle Ages Dalmatian cities (communes) went through the period of intensive economic, scientific, and cultural progress caused by relatively stabile political circumstances particularly in the period of Angevin dominion over Dalmatia. The progress of Dalmatian cities in the period between the 13th and the 15th century is best reflected in the growing economy, trade, artisans’, and arts production as well as in the growth of the population of Dalmatian communes. During their flourishing in that period Dalmatian cities attracted a great number of foreign and native individuals belonging to the upper strata of communal society. These individuals were skilled and learned in best medieval schools forming some kind of elite of Dalmatian communes. In this session the main attention will be paid to three groups of elite professions (artists, notaries, and clergymen) which significantly influenced daily life in Dalmatian communal societies and created the intellectual climate in these communes. Particularly important was the fact that these individuals originated not only from Dalmatia but also from other European regions.