IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 1203: Adaptation and Domination: Forms of Legitimation in the Early Middle Ages, I

Wednesday 11 July 2007, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Guido M. Berndt, Institut zur interdisziplinären Erforschung des Mittelalters & seines Nachwirkens, Universität Paderborn
Roland Steinacher, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Ralph Mathisen, Department of History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Paper 1203-aImitatio or Aemulatio: The Vandal Regnum
(Language: English)
Roland Steinacher, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought
Paper 1203-bImitatio imperii at the End of the 6th Century in Spain: A Turning Point of Visigothic Domination and Ideology?
(Language: English)
Manuel Koch, Institut zur Interdisziplinären Erforschung des Mittelalters und seines Nachwirkens, Universität Paderborn
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought
Paper 1203-cContinuity or Change?: Use and Administration of Treasures from Late Antiquity to Early Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Matthias Hardt, Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum für Kultur & Geschichte Ostmitteleuropas e.V. (GWZO), Universität Leipzig
Abstract

Different forms of legitimising Power in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, beginning with the barbarian successor states of the 5th century and up to the realm of Charlemagne, will be observed. In this context the idea of imitatio imperii represents the focus of the first session. Starting from an analysis of the phenomenon of imitatio as a scholarly concept the two following papers will discuss the particular circumstances of it concerning the Vandal and Visigothic kingdoms. The second session offers a cross-check to these concepts by looking at the periphery of the Byzantine territory and opens the theme to a wider range. Altogether, considering the specific conditions by offering different case studies, a comparison of distinctive structures of barbarian state formations and later power legitimation will be given.