IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 1210: Texts and Identities, VII: Time Archives (ii)

Wednesday 11 July 2007, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht / Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Organisers:Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Gerda Heydemann, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Rob Meens, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Conrad Leyser, Centre for Late Antiquity, University of Manchester
Paper 1210-aThe Power of Time: The Sense of the Past in Medieval Monastic Chronicles
(Language: English)
Antonio Sennis, Department of History, University College London
Paper 1210-bThe Chronicle of Ado of Vienne
(Language: English)
James Palmer, School of History, University of Nottingham
Paper 1210-cThe Chronicle of Sulpicius Severus and Its Echo in the Apocalyptical Discourse of 5th-Century Writings
(Language: English)
Veronika Wieser, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Abstract

The Vienna-based project ‘Time archives’ which focuses on an analysis of the construction of time in Medieval Europe in the first millennium, will be presented in two sessions that continue last year’s introduction. The six papers will concentrate on different aspects of time perception and time theories. Firstly fundamental theories, such as the philosophical time analysis of Augustine, which was the model for many later treatises on the topic, some of which will be presented (Corradini). A second paper problematises the early-medieval relationship between time and work (Meens). The perspective is completed by a paper that concentrates on expressions of Carolingian dynastic history which can be traced in the complex of royal funerary monuments, manuscripts and liturgy at Lorsch (Tischler). Two papers focus on the ‘pragmatical ‘ uses of time in medieval chronicles, on a general level (Sennis) and with the example of Ado of Vienne (Palmer). In a further paper the apocalyptical narrative in the chronicle of Sulpicius Severus as a final time concept is investigated (Wieser). All papers include an analysis of the different ways of using resources of time and temporal expressions in the Early Middle Ages.