IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 224: Writing Professionals and the Structuring of the Political and Institutional Fabric of Portuguese Cities in the Late Middle Ages

Monday 9 July 2007, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Centro de História, Universidade de Lisboa
Organiser:Bernardo de Sá-Nogueira, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa
Moderator/Chair:Bernardo de Sá-Nogueira, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa
Paper 224-bDrafting of Uncommon Contracts, Evidencing Complex Local-Specific Social and Economic Relationships
(Language: English)
Bernardo de Sá-Nogueira, Departamento de História, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Economics - Urban, Literacy and Orality, Local History
Paper 224-cNotaries-Public versus Episcopal Notaries: The Examples of Braga and Porto, Two Portuguese Cities of Episcopal Rule in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Maria Cristina Almeida e Cunha, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade do Porto
Maria João de Oliveira e Silva, Fundação para a Ciência & Tecnologia, Universidade do Porto
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Local History
Paper 224-dUse and Circulation of Documents in Three Cities of Central Portugal: Coimbra, Santarém, and Lisboa in the 13th-14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Filipa Roldão, Faculdade de Letras, Universidade de Lisboa / Fundação para a Ciência & Tecnologia, Lisboa
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Literacy and Orality, Local History
Abstract

In the reign of Portuguese King Afonso II (1211-1223), modern notaries-public appeared in Portuguese cities and towns, and the profile and practices of writing professionals henceforth changed significantly. As a result of increasingly structured political, economic, and social life, around ever stronger urban centres, literate individuals and groups helped create, develop, and strengthen institutions that relied on written documents as basis for all activities. We look into how tax, financial, and economic administration soon depended upon them, as cement of solid document-based governance.