IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 317: Civic, Episcopal, and Royal Narratives

Monday 9 July 2007, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Nurith Kenaan-Kedar, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Moderator/Chair:Nurith Kenaan-Kedar, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Paper 317-aCivic and Familial Pride in Medieval Ulm
(Language: English)
Assaf Pinkus, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 317-bActs of Charity and the Miserable: The Sculptural Programme of the St Maurice Cathedral in Angers
(Language: English)
Nurith Kenaan-Kedar, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Sculpture
Paper 317-cThe Ancient Armenian Community of Jerusalem: Its 20th-Century Visual Narratives in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
(Language: English)
Nirit Shalev-Khalifa, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting
Abstract

The papers will discuss issues of the diverse narratives of towns, bishops and royalty in three different traditions and periods.
During the 14th century the city of Ulm experienced the culmination of its political and economic prosperity, obtaining its independence from both imperial and spiritual patrons. The first paper will inquire the unique imagery installed in the grand Marian portal of Ulm’s new parish church as a manifestation of the city’s political aspirations and as a personal performance of its burgomaster Lutz Krafft.
The second paper will deal with the corbel series in the north transept of Saint Maurice Cathedral in Angers, which depicts images of the sick and the miserable of society, illustrating how this unique cycle expresses the relationship between bishop, royalty, and the hospital of the city of Angers.
The third paper will introduce the monumental wall paintings from the chapel of St. Gregory the Illuminator in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which were donated by the Armenian community and patriarchate to express the life and continuous tradition of the ancient Armenian community in Jerusalem.