IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 515: Law and Justice in the City, III: The City of London and the Common Law in the Later Middle Ages

Tuesday 10 July 2007, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Metropolitan History, University of London
Organiser:Matthew Davies, Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Hannes Kleineke, History of Parliament Trust, London
Paper 515-aPlaying the Game: How Medieval Litigants Used and Abused the Courts of Common Pleas
(Language: English)
Penny Tucker, Independent Scholar, Crediton
Index terms: Administration, Law, Local History
Paper 515-bLondoners and the Court of Common Pleas in the 15th Century
(Language: English)
Matthew Frank Stevens, Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Economics - General, Law, Local History
Paper 515-cHigh Politics and Personal Gain in the Records of the Common Pleas: Marmaduke Lumley and the Chancellorship of St Paul's
(Language: English)
Jonathan Mackman, Centre for Metropolitan History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Law, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The use of the law by inhabitants of medieval towns and cities sheds light not merely on legal processes and institutions, but also on subjects such as social relations, trade, and politics. This session deals with several aspects of the intersections between London, its inhabitants, and the common law, including the relationships between the courts in London and the central courts, and how the common law was used and understood by the inhabitants of the city, and their counterparts in the regions, in a variety of areas of everyday life, including property ownership, trade, and politics.