IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 526: The Diocese of Sodor: A Legacy of the Viking Age?

Tuesday 10 July 2007, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Sarah E. Thomas, Departments of Archaeology & History, University of Glasgow
Moderator/Chair:Matthew H. Hammond, School of Historical Studies, University of Glasgow
Paper 526-aFifty Years Late: Why did Sodor Only Join the Scandinavian Ecclesiastical World in 1154?
(Language: English)
Ian Beuermann, Institute of Archaeology, Conservation & Historical Studies (IAKH), University of Oslo
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 526-bThe Monastery of Iona: Patronage and Landholdings
(Language: English)
Janet MacDonald, School of Humanities (Celtic & Gaelic), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 526-cPolitical Rift or Ambitious Cleric: The Election of Archdeacon Cormac as Bishop of Sodor in July 1331
(Language: English)
Sarah E. Thomas, Departments of Archaeology & History, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The diocese of Sodor stretched from the Isle of Man in the south to the Butt of Lewis in the north. It was suspended between the competing secular powers of modern Norway, Scotland, Ireland and England and this pressure ultimately resulted in the break between Man and the Hebrides. Man was first associated with the metropolitan authority of Canterbury, and all of Sodor then under that of York, until it joined the Norwegian archbishopric of Niðaróss in 1154. These three papers examine the diocese’s response to the stresses and strains of its extraordinary geo-political situation.