IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 617: Towns and Identity in Late Medieval Wales

Tuesday 10 July 2007, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), University of Wales, Swansea
Organiser:Helen Fulton, Department of English, Swansea University
Moderator/Chair:Helen Mary Carrel, Clare College, University of Cambridge
Paper 617-aTowns in Medieval Welsh Poetry
(Language: English)
Dafydd Johnston, Department of Welsh, Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Social History
Paper 617-bWho Were the Townsfolk of Medieval Wales?
(Language: English)
Ralph A. Griffiths, Department of History, Swansea University
Index terms: Local History, Social History
Paper 617-cFairs and Urban Ritual in Medieval Wales
(Language: English)
Helen Fulton, Department of English, Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Social History
Abstract

Towns in medieval Wales arrived with the Normans and were expanded after the conquest of North Wales by Edward I in 1284. From the Welsh point of view, towns were associated with colonization and economic oppression. As in other parts of Britain, however, towns in Wales also brought economic and cultural benefits to their regions and hinterlands. Papers in this session examine some of the consequences of urban settlement in medieval Wales and its effect on cultural identity. Evidence from literary, historical, and architectural sources will be used to suggest the ambivalent relations between the native Welsh population and the colonial towns.