IMC 2007: Sessions

Session 713: Le Mans: City, Cathedral, and Culture in the 11th and 12th Centuries, I

Tuesday 10 July 2007, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Organiser:Anne Lawrence-Mathers, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair:Lindy Grant, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Paper 713-aEpiscopal Administration in Le Mans, c. 1090-1150
(Language: English)
Richard E. Barton, Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara
Index terms: Administration, Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life
Paper 713-bEpistolarity in the Writings of Hildebert of Lavardin, Bishop of Le Mans, 1096-1125
(Language: English)
Gillian Rose Knight, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Religious Life, Rhetoric
Paper 713-cThe Reception of the Works of Hildebert of Lavardin in England
(Language: English)
Anne Lawrence-Mathers, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography, Monasticism
Abstract

Le Mans is famous as the city around which people drive; the medievalist, however, should stop. In two linked sessions the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies (University of Reading) will explore the cultural and intellectual vitality of this great medieval city.
Few cities combine so much remaining medieval fabric with such rich, and such unexploited, medieval documentary sources. Built by the Romans, and maintained by the Franks and the Carolingians to keep the Bretons at bay, Le Mans was fought over by Normans and the counts of Anjou, to become one of the most important cities in the Angevin Empire. This first session will focus on the contribution of the bishops of Le Mans and their growing reputation in the 12th century.