IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 1525: Texts and Identities, IX: Carolingian Bishops - Potentials and Problems

Thursday 10 July 2008, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht / Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Organisers:Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Gerda Heydemann, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
Rob Meens, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Mayke de Jong, Instituut Geschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 1525-aPurity of ecclesia: The Symbolism of Baptism in Early Medieval Sources on Church Dedication
(Language: English)
Miriam Czock, Historisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum
Paper 1525-bCarolingian Northern Italy: A Literary Desert?
(Language: English)
Richard M. Pollard, Trinity College, University of Cambridge / British School at Rome
Paper 1525-cThe Cockle of the Mission Field: St Boniface's Use of Biblical Metaphor in his Condemnations of Hostile Frankish Bishops
(Language: English)
John-Henry Clay, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Abstract

The papers in this session all investigate aspects of power relations and (literary) texts within the Carolingian Church. Miriam Czock examines early medieval sources on church dedication. These texts make a close connection between church dedication and the rite of baptism – by taking a close look at the texts and at the concept of purity underlying both rites, the paper attempts to demonstrate how both baptism and church dedication were made fruitful to guide the congregation on Christian ways.
The second paper (Richard M. Pollard) takes a look at literary culture in Carolingian northern Italy, which has typically been viewed with derision, with many remarking on the paucity of authors and production. An examination of lesser known texts, such as letters, hagiography, and the Latin therein, as well as a look at the manuscripts and annotations to manuscripts produced in this period, can help to give a different perspective on this part of Italy’s cultural history.
Julia Smith explores late Carolingian appropriations of an holy 8th-century past. Her paper will deal with the context in which Adelhelm of Sées wrote the Life and Miracles of St Opportuna, and will argue that his writing tells us more about this otherwise unknown bishop than it does about the putative 8th-century saint whom he regarded as his patron and protector during a troubled and turbulent episcopacy.