IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 210: Approaching the Byzantine Family, II: Imperial Families

Monday 7 July 2008, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Margaret E. Mullett, Institute of Byzantine Studies, Queen's University, Belfast
Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Paper 210-aByzantine Masculinities: Birth, Life, and Death
(Language: English)
Eve Davies, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Political Thought, Social History
Paper 210-bGrandmothers: A Royal Pain in the Neck?
(Language: English)
Helen Ruth Wood, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Gender Studies, Social History
Paper 210-cFamilies on Byzantine Coins
(Language: English)
Jonathan Shea, Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Numismatics, Social History
Abstract

The second session on ‘Approaching the Byzantine Family’ focuses on the imperial family. Eve Hancock examines the intense family rivalries for imperial power which existed in Byzantium. Helen Wood considers specifically the case of the grandmother of the imperial children during Second Iconoclasm. She asks if there was a clearly defined role for a grandmother, and whether this depended on her status, character or economic station. Jonathan Shea looks at images of the imperial family on Byzantine coins. He will explore the different reasons that the emperor chose to share his place on coinage with his family.