IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 304: Hagiography and Cult of the Martyrs, II: The Renewal of the Cult of Early Martyrs in the Middle Ages

Monday 7 July 2008, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Centre Régional Universitaire Lorrain d'Histoire (CRULH), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz
Organiser:Michèle Gaillard, Département d'Histoire / Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille III
Moderator/Chair:Anne-Marie Helvétius, amhelvetius@univ-paris8.fr
Paper 304-aThe Rictiovarus' Cycle: The Manuscript Evidence (9th-11th Centuries)
(Language: English)
Michèle Gaillard, Département d'Histoire / Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille III
Index terms: Hagiography, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 304-bThe Martyrs of Trier: Origins and Development of a Legend, 10th-12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Klaus Krönert, UMR 'Textes, Histoire Et Monuments, de l'Antiquité au Moyen-Age', Université de Paris X - Nanterre
Index terms: Hagiography, Mentalities, Religious Life
Paper 304-cHow to Move a Saint: The Recontextualisation of Serena, Martyr of Spoleto
(Language: English)
Gordon Blennemann, Deutsches Historisches Institut, Paris / Mittelalterliche Geschichte und Historische Hilfswissenschaften, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
Index terms: Hagiography, Mentalities, Religious Life
Abstract

As far as comparative hagiography is concerned, few studies have dealt with martyrs. Nonetheless, martyrs remain an hagiographic topic shared by different cultural times and areas and the success of the martyr’s cult was foremost during the whole medieval period.The second session will deal with the revival of the cult of ancient martyrs during the Middle Ages, through the writing or rewriting of literary cycles. These cycles consist of hagiographical narratives linked to each other by the figures of the martyrs and their persecutors. This revival also consist in creating a new cult thanks to a spectacular invention or translation of some martyr’s relics so far forgotten or neglected.