IMC 2008: Sessions

Session 619: Nature and Divine Order, II: The Visual Transformation of Nature in Religious Plays and Other Religious Text Genres

Tuesday 8 July 2008, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft
Organiser:Cora Dietl, Institut für Germanistik, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Gießen
Moderator/Chair:Cora Dietl, Institut für Germanistik, Justus-Liebig-Universität, Gießen
Paper 619-aThe Transformation of Landscape in Late Medieval Shepherds' Plays
(Language: English)
Vicente Chacón Carmona, Departmento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana, Universidad de Sevilla
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English, Lay Piety, Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 619-b'Go grese thi shepe under the toute': Nature, Man, and the 'Natural Man' in Mactacio Abel
(Language: English)
Joe Ricke, Department of English, Taylor University, Indiana
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Lay Piety, Performance Arts - Dance
Paper 619-cThe Animal Kingdom in Medieval Polish Literature
(Language: English)
Jacek Kowzan, School of Modern Languages & Cultures (Russian), University of Glasgow / Podlaska Academy, Siedlce
Index terms: Language and Literature - Slavic, Lay Piety, Religious Life
Abstract

While in didactic literature nature reflects the overall order according to which the world and human life are organised, religious plays visually represent the divine order as it is replicated in nature. In the given context, ‘nature’ implies both the landscape, the animals living in it, and the relationship between man and the natural world. The first two papers of this session examine the transformation of nature as a result of human action and in the context of the history of salvation. They also analyse how the acting figures themselves undergo a transformation when encountering the divine. The third paper examines the symbolic function of animals as visual representatives of divine order in different genres of religious Polish literature, as compared to some secular poems.