IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 101: Getting Knotted: Worm-Looped and Interlaced in Anglo-Saxon Art and Literature

Monday 13 July 2009, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Catherine E. Karkov, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Ian N. Wood, School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 101-aFragments of History: Footnote One - Interlace
(Language: English)
Fred Orton, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Social History
Paper 101-bKnots and the Monument
(Language: English)
Catherine E. Karkov, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Art History - Sculpture, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Paper 101-cThe Visual in the Verbal: Laces and Riddles
(Language: English)
Clare A. Lees, Department of English Language & Literature, King's College London
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Language and Literature - Old English
Abstract

Knots and interlace are two of the most popular motifs in Anglo-Saxon art, though the study of their form use and meaning has never been given the critical treatment it merits. Similarly, ‘knot’ and ‘interlace’ are terms often applied to the structure and meaning of Anglo-Saxon poetry, though their treatment is generally only of a literal nature. The purpose of this session is to take a fresh look at the constructions, classifications, uses, and meanings of knots and interlace in Anglo-Saxon sculpture and literature. What work do they actually do literally, historically, and theoretically?