IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 1117: Medical Orthodoxy, II

Wednesday 15 July 2009, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Alex Bamji, School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 1117-aOrthodox Medicine and Religious Renewal in 12th-Century France
(Language: English)
Mary K. K. Yearl, Independent Scholar, New Haven
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Medicine, Theology
Paper 1117-bScrutinizing the Saints: 13th-Century Concepts of Miraculous Healing
(Language: English)
Louise Wilson, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Hagiography, Medicine, Religious Life
Paper 1117-cEstablishing Trust or Exerting Control?: Medical Licensing and Orthodox Practice
(Language: English)
Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Law, Medicine, Social History
Abstract

This is the second of two sessions exploring the shifting nature of orthodoxy in medieval medicine and healthcare. Does ‘orthodoxy’ in medicine mean adhering to tradition, resisting change, controlling knowledge, or establishing standards of practice in the community? How do academic, royal, ecclesiastical, and municipal interests interact in establishing medical orthodoxy? Do the sick have a view on standards of healing and cure? How do historiographical approaches to medieval medicine become viewed as ‘orthodox’ and how might they be challenged and renewed? The three papers of the second session consider these issues for the period between the 12th and the 15th centuries, exploring the nature of healing and medical knowledge in 12th-century religious writings in France; the relationship between lay and clerical views of the healing miracles of Edmund of Abingdon (1244-47); and the authoritative nature of late medieval licensing of medical practitioners by royal, episcopal, university, and municipal authorities.