IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 1307: English Piety in the Long 11th Century

Wednesday 15 July 2009, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Haskins Society for Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, Angevin & Viking History
Organiser:Carol Davidson Cragoe, English Heritage, London
Moderator/Chair:Sarah M. Hamilton, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Exeter
Paper 1307-aOwning Churches
(Language: English)
Carol Davidson Cragoe, English Heritage, London
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Ecclesiastical History, Lay Piety
Paper 1307-bDedicating Churches
(Language: English)
Chris Lewis, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Lay Piety, Local History
Paper 1307-cGiving Alms to Churches
(Language: English)
Aleisha Olson, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Lay Piety, Social History
Abstract

The 11th century was a key period for the English church, with the restructuring of ecclesiastical boundaries and priorities, and the foundation of many new churches, large and small. Lay people had an important role to play in this process. This session looks at the practice of lay piety in England in the years before and after the Norman Conquest, and focuses in particular on some of the ways that lay people interacted with the Church. The individual papers examine what it meant to own a church, the decisions underlying for specific dedications, and gift giving practices.