IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 1318: Logic and Heresy, II

Wednesday 15 July 2009, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Organiser:Stephen L. Read, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Sara L. Uckelman, Tilburg Center for Logic & Philosophy of Science, Tillburg University
Paper 1318-aCum Petro: Peter Lombard's Sentences and Lateran IV
(Language: English)
Clare Monagle, Department of History, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Philosophy, Theology
Paper 1318-bThe Nova responsio: Logical Heresy in Roger Swyneshed's Obligationes
(Language: English)
Stephen L. Read, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Philosophy
Paper 1318-cLogical Theology or Theological Logic: What Happened between 1400 and 1600?
(Language: English)
Karin Verelst, FUND-CLEA, Department of Mathematics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Index terms: Philosophy, Science
Abstract

The original contribution of medieval logic (the logica modernorum), like much of medieval philosophy, was a response to the recovery of Aristotle’s works, including most of his logical treatises (the logica nova), during the 12th and early 13th centuries. The primary task of medieval philosophy was to find an accommodation between Aristotle’s teachings and those of the church. Logic was the tool whereby that consistency was measured. This led to the development of theories of fallacy, of disputations, including obligational disputations, and of properties of terms, dominant theories of logic through to the Renaissance and beyond.