IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 1522: Hagiography and Archaeology: Contrasts and Convergences (4th-11th Centuries)

Thursday 16 July 2009, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre Régional Universitaire Lorrain d'Histoire-Université de Metz
Organiser:Michèle Gaillard, Département d'Histoire / Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille III
Moderator/Chair:Ralph Mathisen, Department of History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Paper 1522-aBetween Vitae and Archaeology: The Case of the Holy Tombs of the Abbots Lupicinus (5th Century) and Valbertus (7th Century)
(Language: English)
Sébastien Bully, Archéologie-Terre-Histoire-Sociétés (ARTeHIS - UMR 5594), Université de Bourgogne
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Hagiography, Liturgy, Religious Life
Paper 1522-bThe Tomb of the Martyr Quentinus from the 4th to 10th Centuries: Hagiographic Evidence and Recent Archaeological Investigations
(Language: English)
Michèle Gaillard, Département d'Histoire / Institut de Recherches Historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS - UMR 8529), Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille III
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Hagiography, Local History, Religious Life
Paper 1522-cThe Tomb and the Miracles of the Cluniac Abbots Mayeul and Odilo in Souvigny in the 11th Century: A Confrontation of Texts and Material Evidence
(Language: English)
Pascale Chevalier, Archéologie-Terre-Histoire-Sociétés (ARTeHIS - UMR 5594), Université de Bourgogne, Dijon / Département d'Histoire, Université Blaise-Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Hagiography, Monasticism, Religious Life
Abstract

Throughout the confrontation of hagiography and the results of archaeological investigations, the session likes to study in particular the forms and circumstances of the veneration of saint bodies in monastic communities in the early Middle Ages. All chosen locations are currently objects of archaeological investigations. So it will be possible to consider methodological problems of this combination of written and material evidence and to point out at the same time developments in liturgy and architecture as a result of the cult of saints venerated at these places. The chronology will range from the from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages. Some of the most important centres of early occidental monarchism have been chosen: the abbey of Saint-Claude situated in the Jura, the abbey of Luxeuil founded by Columbanus in the Vosges, the great Carolingian abbey of Saint-Quentin in Picardie, and the Cluniac abbey of Souvigny.