IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 506: Texts and Identities, IV: Time Archives (IV), 2

Tuesday 14 July 2009, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Richard Corradini, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Maximilian Diesenberger, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Melissa Markauskas, Department of Religions & Theology, University of Manchester
Paper 506-aAugustine and Chronicles
(Language: English)
Richard Corradini, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 506-bSoul Searching between Augustine and Cassiodorus
(Language: English)
Symke Haverkamp, School of Classics, University of St Andrews
Paper 506-cThe Interpretation of Heresy in the Historiographical and Hagiographical Sources of Aquitaine during the Early and High Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Julien Bellarbre, UFR Lettres et Sciences Humaines, Université de Cergy-Pontoise / Faculté des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines, Université de Limoges
Abstract

Augustine was one of the most influential thinkers not only for early medieval theology, but also for historiographical concepts. His approach to history can be seen in contrast to other historiographical sources, like the chronicles of Orosius or Eusebius/Jerome. Augustine’s concept of history will be interpreted as a kind of stumbling block for writing texts on timekeeping (Richard Corradini). The second paper is part of an ongoing research project on the reception of Augustine. It explores Augustine’s anthropology, specifically his ideas on the soul, in the early middle ages. In this paper the reception of Augustine in Cassiodorus’ De anima is investigated (Symke Haverkamp). The final paper will examine the increasing use of the word ‘heresy’ after the turn of the millennium, whether it’s aimed at describing ‘Manichean’ (pre-Cathar ?) heretics or simply church-reformers, without neglecting the depiction of more ancient heresies (such as Arianism) in more ancient sources. Did Aquitanian historians and hagiographers write a lot about heresy before the major event represented by the Albigensian crusade at the beginning of the 13th century? (Julien Bellarbre).