IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 521: Middle English Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ: Geographies of Orthodoxy

Tuesday 14 July 2009, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:AHRC Project 'Geographies of Orthodoxy', St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / Queen's University Belfast
Organiser:Allan Fogh Westphall, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / School of English, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:John J. Thompson, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
Paper 521-aPseudo-Vernacular Theology and Pseudo-Bonaventuran Mirrors
(Language: English)
Ian Johnson, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies / School of English, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Lay Piety, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 521-bThe Carthusian Audience of Nicholas Love's Mirror
(Language: English)
David Falls, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 521-cMirroring the Life of Christ for Carthusian and Birgittine Audiences: A Mirror to Devout People and Ulrich Pinder's Speculum Passionis
(Language: English)
Allan Fogh Westphall, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews / School of English, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

Geographies of Orthodoxy: Mapping the English Pseudo-Bonaventuran Lives of Christ, c.1350-1550 is an AHRC-funded Queen’s, Belfast-St Andrews project (2007-10) which promises to reshape understanding of late medieval vernacular and religious textual culture through codicological and textual analysis of the entire manuscript corpus of English pseudo-Bonaventuran Meditationes vitae Christi, a tradition central to orthodox Christological representations from the later Middle Ages to the Reformation. In this session project members will talk about issues of audience, monastic and lay culture, a reconsideration of the genre of Christological literary mirrors and of the debatable phenomenon of vernacular theology. (http://www.qub.ac.uk/geographies-of-orthodoxy)