IMC 2009: Sessions

Session 529: From Politics to Prosopography: Britain and Ireland in the 12th and 13th Centuries, I - The Paradox of Medieval Scotland, 1093-1286

Tuesday 14 July 2009, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Scottish & Celtic Studies, University of Glasgow
Organiser:Matthew H. Hammond, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair:John Reuben Davies, North East Wales Institute, Wrexham / University of Nottingham
Paper 529-aThe Scotticization of the Kingdom of the Scots
(Language: English)
Dauvit Broun, School of Humanities (History), University of Glasgow
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 529-bThe Adoption of Charters among the Aristocracy of Scotland
(Language: English)
Matthew H. Hammond, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Genealogy and Prosopography, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 529-cEnglish Perspectives on the Paradox of Medieval Scotland
(Language: English)
David Carpenter, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Rees Davies observed of Scotland that ‘paradoxically, the most extensively English-settled and Anglicised part of the British Isles was the country which retained its political independence’ (The First English Empire, 170). The paradox could go deeper. Is it a coincidence that it was only in the 13th century, when Anglicisation became dominant in the lowlands, that the kingdom of the Scots ceased to be regarded by its inhabitants as a realm of many regions and began to be thought of as a single country and people? In one sense the kingdom was becoming more self-consciously Scottish; and yet its history in this period is typically seen in terms of native distinctiveness being eroded by the influx of English immigration, social institutions and culture. This session attempts to create a foundation for further study into these processes.